A bioluminescent Pseudomonas aeruginosa wound model reveals increased mortality of type 1 diabetic mice to biofilm infection

A. M. Agostinho Hunt, J. A. Gibson, C. L. Larrivee, S. O'Reilly, S. Navitskaya, D. B. Needle, R. B. Abramovitch, J. V. Busik, C. M. Waters

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

Abstract

Objective: To examine how bacterial biofilms, as contributing factors in the delayed closure of chronic wounds in patients with diabetes, affect the healing process. Method: We used daily microscopic imaging and the IVIS Spectrum in vivo imaging system to monitor biofilm infections of bioluminescent Pseudomonas aeruginosa and evaluate healing in non-diabetic and streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. Results: Our studies determined that diabetes alone did not affect the rate of healing of full-depth murine back wounds compared with non-diabetic mice. The application of mature biofilms to the wounds significantly decreased the rate of healing compared with non-infected wounds for both non-diabetic as well as diabetic mice. Diabetic mice were also more severely affected by biofilms displaying elevated pus production, higher mortality rates and statistically significant increase in wound depth, granulation/fibrosis and biofilm presence. Introduction of a mutant Pseudomonas aeruginosa capable of producing high concentrations of cyclic di-GMP did not result in increased persistence in either diabetic or non-diabetic animals compared with the wild type strain.

LanguageEnglish (US)
PagesS24-S33
JournalJournal of Wound Care
Volume26
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2017

Profile

Biofilms
Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Mortality
Wounds and Injuries
Infection
Suppuration
Streptozocin
Fibrosis
bis(3',5')-cyclic diguanylic acid

Keywords

  • Biofilm
  • Cyclic di-GMP
  • Infection
  • Pseudomonas aeruginosa
  • Wound healing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Fundamentals and skills
  • Nursing (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Agostinho Hunt, A. M., Gibson, J. A., Larrivee, C. L., O'Reilly, S., Navitskaya, S., Needle, D. B., ... Waters, C. M. (2017). A bioluminescent Pseudomonas aeruginosa wound model reveals increased mortality of type 1 diabetic mice to biofilm infection. Journal of Wound Care, 26(7), S24-S33. DOI: 10.12968/jowc.2017.26.Sup7.S24

A bioluminescent Pseudomonas aeruginosa wound model reveals increased mortality of type 1 diabetic mice to biofilm infection. / Agostinho Hunt, A. M.; Gibson, J. A.; Larrivee, C. L.; O'Reilly, S.; Navitskaya, S.; Needle, D. B.; Abramovitch, R. B.; Busik, J. V.; Waters, C. M.

In: Journal of Wound Care, Vol. 26, No. 7, 01.07.2017, p. S24-S33.

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

Agostinho Hunt AM, Gibson JA, Larrivee CL, O'Reilly S, Navitskaya S, Needle DB et al. A bioluminescent Pseudomonas aeruginosa wound model reveals increased mortality of type 1 diabetic mice to biofilm infection. Journal of Wound Care. 2017 Jul 1;26(7):S24-S33. Available from, DOI: 10.12968/jowc.2017.26.Sup7.S24
Agostinho Hunt, A. M. ; Gibson, J. A. ; Larrivee, C. L. ; O'Reilly, S. ; Navitskaya, S. ; Needle, D. B. ; Abramovitch, R. B. ; Busik, J. V. ; Waters, C. M./ A bioluminescent Pseudomonas aeruginosa wound model reveals increased mortality of type 1 diabetic mice to biofilm infection. In: Journal of Wound Care. 2017 ; Vol. 26, No. 7. pp. S24-S33
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