A mild approach for bio-oil stabilization and upgrading: Electrocatalytic hydrogenation using ruthenium supported on activated carbon cloth

Zhenglong Li, Shantanu Kelkar, Lauren Raycraft, Mahlet Garedew, James E. Jackson, Dennis J. Miller, Christopher M. Saffron

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Electrocatalytic hydrogenation (ECH) offers a new approach for bio-oil stabilization (a.k.a. partial upgrading). Water-soluble bio-oil, obtained by aqueous extraction of the liquid product of biomass pyrolysis, was hydrogenated using ECH at room conditions. A new electrocatalyst, ruthenium supported on activated carbon cloth, was used as the catalytic cathode. After electrocatalytic hydrogenation, aldehydes and ketones were reduced to the corresponding alcohols or diols, forms less prone to condensation chemistry. Carbon recovery into the liquid product, important when making liquid fuels from biomass, was more than 80%, while less than 0.1 wt% of the water-soluble bio-oil formed solid precipitate. The stability of the ECH-treated water-soluble bio-oil was checked via an accelerated aging test followed by size exclusion chromatography analysis and viscometry. Besides stabilization of bio-oil for subsequent fuel production, hydrogen and valuable diols were produced during ECH. Strategies to optimize the energy efficiency of this approach by altering the cell design, modifying the catalyst and adjusting the reaction conditions were also explored.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages844-852
Number of pages9
JournalGreen Chemistry
Volume16
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2014

Profile

ruthenium
Ruthenium
Activated carbon
Hydrogenation
activated carbon
Oils
stabilization
Stabilization
oil
liquid
Water
Biomass
Size exclusion chromatography
Electrocatalysts
Viscosity measurement
Liquid fuels
biomass
Liquids
ketone
Hydrogen production

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Pollution

Cite this

A mild approach for bio-oil stabilization and upgrading : Electrocatalytic hydrogenation using ruthenium supported on activated carbon cloth. / Li, Zhenglong; Kelkar, Shantanu; Raycraft, Lauren; Garedew, Mahlet; Jackson, James E.; Miller, Dennis J.; Saffron, Christopher M.

In: Green Chemistry, Vol. 16, No. 2, 02.2014, p. 844-852.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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