A scanning electron microscopy outreach program

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Abstract

    This paper describes an outreach program based on scanning electron microscopy education, termed SEMED. This program involved hands-on instruction in use of a scanning electron microscope and was designed to stimulate students' interest in learning more about materials science and engineering. The major objective was to educate middle and high school students, their teachers, and non materials science and engineering majors on campus about materials science and engineering. Since the SEMED program's inception in 2002, over 350 local high school students and their teachers have been educated through the SEMED outreach program. This successful outreach activity encouraged students to consider enrolling in university science programs including materials science and engineering. We have solicited student and teacher questionnaires from the local middle and high school participants and used the information to improve the program. In addition, data was collected regarding the impact of the program on the decisions made by the students regarding their career/major choices. Another objective of this outreach engineering education activity was to provide undergraduate and graduate materials science and engineering students with an opportunity to learn about materials science and engineering through an educational experience involving instruction of local high school students and nonengineering majors on campus. This activity provided beneficial leadership and instructional skills to all the students who participated. The intent of this activity was to allow the undergraduate students to teach the techniques they learned in their undergraduate microscopy course, namely secondary electron microscopy sample preparation and microstructural characterization techniques including how to operate a scanning electron microscope and obtain useful data such as images and sample compositional information. Thus the students traveled full circle on the education process cycle through the "learn one, do one, teach one" philosophy. The undergraduate microscopy course contained a significant hands-on laboratory component, and the service-learning component was considered to be a major part of this activity. The activity also resulted in a greater knowledge and appreciation by high school students and non-materials science students of what materials science and engineering entails, and it served to attract such students to a career related to materials science and engineering. This paper highlights all aspects of the SEMED program.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Title of host publicationTMS Annual Meeting
    Pages1-10
    Number of pages10
    StatePublished - 2007
    Event136th TMS Annual Meeting, 2007 - Orlando, FL, United States

    Other

    Other136th TMS Annual Meeting, 2007
    CountryUnited States
    CityOrlando, FL
    Period2/25/073/1/07

    Profile

    student
    Neurophysiological Recruitment
    Students
    engineering
    Aldehyde Reductase
    Materials science
    education
    microscopy
    learning
    scanning electron microscopy
    electron
    Biophysics
    Electron microscopes
    Education
    Scanning
    Scanning electron microscopy
    Microscopic examination
    sample preparation
    electron microscopy
    leadership

    Keywords

    • Education
    • Outreach
    • Scanning electron microscopy

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Geology
    • Metals and Alloys

    Cite this

    Boehlert, C. J. (2007). A scanning electron microscopy outreach program. In TMS Annual Meeting (pp. 1-10)

    A scanning electron microscopy outreach program. / Boehlert, C. J.

    TMS Annual Meeting. 2007. p. 1-10.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Boehlert, CJ 2007, A scanning electron microscopy outreach program. in TMS Annual Meeting. pp. 1-10, 136th TMS Annual Meeting, 2007, Orlando, FL, United States, 25-1 March.
    Boehlert CJ. A scanning electron microscopy outreach program. In TMS Annual Meeting. 2007. p. 1-10.

    Boehlert, C. J. / A scanning electron microscopy outreach program.

    TMS Annual Meeting. 2007. p. 1-10.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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