Accountability and transparency diluted in the Flint water crisis: A case of institutional implosion

Manuel Chavez, Marta Perez, Carin Tunney, Silvia Núñez

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

Abstract

This article examines two major institutions widely touted in the United States as servants to communities and the general public: the government and the news media. The Flint water crisis is a textbook case in which these two institutions failed to live up to their responsibilities of accountability and transparency. The authors examine the major events during the water crisis, looking at it through the lens of government actions and how the press covered them, conducting qualitative context analysis during the first five months of the crisis. The analysis includes the actions of federal, state, and local agencies and the reporting of national, state, and local newspapers. Their findings show that the institutions completely imploded, with an impact on thousands of residents, many of whom happened to be minorities.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages11-52
Number of pages42
JournalNorteamerica
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2017

Profile

transparency
water
responsibility
Accountability
Water
Transparency
Government
context analysis
major event
servants
federal state
textbook
newspaper
news
minority
resident
community
Textbooks
Residents
Responsibility

Keywords

  • Accountability
  • Flint
  • Lead contamination
  • News media
  • Public health
  • Transparency
  • Watchdog function
  • Water crisis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Political Science and International Relations
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Economics, Econometrics and Finance(all)
  • Law

Cite this

Accountability and transparency diluted in the Flint water crisis : A case of institutional implosion. / Chavez, Manuel; Perez, Marta; Tunney, Carin; Núñez, Silvia.

In: Norteamerica, Vol. 12, No. 1, 2017, p. 11-52.

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

Chavez, Manuel ; Perez, Marta ; Tunney, Carin ; Núñez, Silvia. / Accountability and transparency diluted in the Flint water crisis : A case of institutional implosion. In: Norteamerica. 2017 ; Vol. 12, No. 1. pp. 11-52
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