Acetate adaptation of clostridia tyrobutyricum for improved fermentation production of butyrate

Adam M. Jaros, Ulrika Rova, Kris A. Berglund

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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    Abstract

    Clostridium tyrobutyricum ATCC 25755 is an acidogenic bacterium capable of utilizing xylose for the fermentation production of butyrate. Hot water extraction of hardwood lingocellulose is an efficient method of producing xylose where autohydrolysis of xylan is catalysed by acetate originating from acetyl groups present in hemicellulose. The presence of acetic acid in the hydrolysate might have a severe impact on the subsequent fermentations. In this study the fermentation kinetics of C. tyrobutyricum cultures after being classically adapted for growth at 26.3 g/L acetate equivalents were studied. Analysis of xylose batch fermentations found that even in the presence of high levels of acetate, acetate adapted strains had similar fermentation kinetics as the parental strain cultivated without acetate. The parental strain exposed to acetate at inhibitory conditions demonstrated a pronounced lag phase (over 100 hours) in growth and butyrate production as compared to the adapted strain (25 hour lag) or non-inhibited controls (0 lag). Additional insight into the metabolic pathway of xylose consumption was gained by determining the specific activity of the acetate kinase (AK) enzyme in adapted versus control batches. AK activity was reduced by 63% in the presence of inhibitory levels of acetate, whether or not the culture had been adapted.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)1-8
    Number of pages8
    JournalSpringerPlus
    Volume2
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    StatePublished - 2013

    Profile

    Fermentation
    Carbamoyl-Phosphate Synthase (Glutamine-Hydrolyzing)
    Erythrasma
    Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome
    Speech Disorders
    Blood Flow Velocity
    Bufo arenarum
    Hardwoods
    Metabolic Networks and Pathways

    Keywords

    • Acetate inhibition
    • Butyrate
    • Clostridium tyrobutyricum
    • Hemicellulose utilization
    • Xylose fermentation

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • General

    Cite this

    Acetate adaptation of clostridia tyrobutyricum for improved fermentation production of butyrate. / Jaros, Adam M.; Rova, Ulrika; Berglund, Kris A.

    In: SpringerPlus, Vol. 2, No. 1, 2013, p. 1-8.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Jaros, Adam M.; Rova, Ulrika; Berglund, Kris A. / Acetate adaptation of clostridia tyrobutyricum for improved fermentation production of butyrate.

    In: SpringerPlus, Vol. 2, No. 1, 2013, p. 1-8.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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    abstract = "Clostridium tyrobutyricum ATCC 25755 is an acidogenic bacterium capable of utilizing xylose for the fermentation production of butyrate. Hot water extraction of hardwood lingocellulose is an efficient method of producing xylose where autohydrolysis of xylan is catalysed by acetate originating from acetyl groups present in hemicellulose. The presence of acetic acid in the hydrolysate might have a severe impact on the subsequent fermentations. In this study the fermentation kinetics of C. tyrobutyricum cultures after being classically adapted for growth at 26.3 g/L acetate equivalents were studied. Analysis of xylose batch fermentations found that even in the presence of high levels of acetate, acetate adapted strains had similar fermentation kinetics as the parental strain cultivated without acetate. The parental strain exposed to acetate at inhibitory conditions demonstrated a pronounced lag phase (over 100 hours) in growth and butyrate production as compared to the adapted strain (25 hour lag) or non-inhibited controls (0 lag). Additional insight into the metabolic pathway of xylose consumption was gained by determining the specific activity of the acetate kinase (AK) enzyme in adapted versus control batches. AK activity was reduced by 63% in the presence of inhibitory levels of acetate, whether or not the culture had been adapted.",
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    KW - Xylose fermentation

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