Activated carbon from cherry stones

Michael G. Lussier, Jeffrey C. Shull, Dennis J. Miller

    Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

    • 114 Citations

    Abstract

    Fruit stones constitute a significant waste disposal problem for the fruit-processing industry. High-quality activated carbon can be produced from waste cherry stones: the activated carbon is low in impurities and has an adsorption capacity that compares favorably with commercial activated carbons. Activation at 800°C in steam for 2-3 hours, following initial carbonization, produces an activated carbon in about 10% yield (by weight) of the initial cherry stone. The activated carbons produced have surface areas (CO2 adsorption) as high as 1200 m2/g and CCl4 numbers of 70-80. Activation in carbon dioxide requires higher temperatures (900°C) and gives a carbon of slightly lower activity. Carbon from the hull, or hard outer portion of the fruit stone, provides essentially all of the adsorption capacity; the inner kernel does not form a microporous material. The hull structure is dominated by 0.4-micron pores which facilitate access to internal microporosity. This structure requires that the carbon be ground to less than 75 micron particles to achieve reasonable adsorption rates.

    LanguageEnglish (US)
    Pages1493-1498
    Number of pages6
    JournalCarbon
    Volume32
    Issue number8
    DOIs
    StatePublished - 1994

    Profile

    Activated carbon
    Adsorption
    Fruits
    Carbon
    Chemical activation
    Microporous materials
    Microporosity
    Steam
    Carbonization
    Carbon Monoxide
    Waste disposal
    Carbon Dioxide
    Impurities
    Processing
    Industry
    Temperature
    Carbon dioxide

    Keywords

    • Activated carbon
    • cherry stones

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Materials Chemistry

    Cite this

    Lussier, M. G., Shull, J. C., & Miller, D. J. (1994). Activated carbon from cherry stones. Carbon, 32(8), 1493-1498. DOI: 10.1016/0008-6223(94)90144-9

    Activated carbon from cherry stones. / Lussier, Michael G.; Shull, Jeffrey C.; Miller, Dennis J.

    In: Carbon, Vol. 32, No. 8, 1994, p. 1493-1498.

    Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

    Lussier, MG, Shull, JC & Miller, DJ 1994, 'Activated carbon from cherry stones' Carbon, vol 32, no. 8, pp. 1493-1498. DOI: 10.1016/0008-6223(94)90144-9
    Lussier MG, Shull JC, Miller DJ. Activated carbon from cherry stones. Carbon. 1994;32(8):1493-1498. Available from, DOI: 10.1016/0008-6223(94)90144-9
    Lussier, Michael G. ; Shull, Jeffrey C. ; Miller, Dennis J./ Activated carbon from cherry stones. In: Carbon. 1994 ; Vol. 32, No. 8. pp. 1493-1498
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