Activated carbon from cherry stones

Michael G. Lussier, Jeffrey C. Shull, Dennis J. Miller

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    • 113 Citations

    Abstract

    Fruit stones constitute a significant waste disposal problem for the fruit-processing industry. High-quality activated carbon can be produced from waste cherry stones: the activated carbon is low in impurities and has an adsorption capacity that compares favorably with commercial activated carbons. Activation at 800°C in steam for 2-3 hours, following initial carbonization, produces an activated carbon in about 10% yield (by weight) of the initial cherry stone. The activated carbons produced have surface areas (CO2 adsorption) as high as 1200 m2/g and CCl4 numbers of 70-80. Activation in carbon dioxide requires higher temperatures (900°C) and gives a carbon of slightly lower activity. Carbon from the hull, or hard outer portion of the fruit stone, provides essentially all of the adsorption capacity; the inner kernel does not form a microporous material. The hull structure is dominated by 0.4-micron pores which facilitate access to internal microporosity. This structure requires that the carbon be ground to less than 75 micron particles to achieve reasonable adsorption rates.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)1493-1498
    Number of pages6
    JournalCarbon
    Volume32
    Issue number8
    DOIs
    StatePublished - 1994

    Profile

    Activated carbon
    Affinity Labels
    Adsorption
    Fruits
    Carbon
    Hypocalcemia
    Chemical activation
    Cape Verde
    Microporous materials
    Microporosity
    Carbonization
    Waste disposal
    Carbon dioxide
    Steam
    Impurities
    Industry
    Temperature
    Berkelium
    Ammotherapy
    Edema Disease of Swine

    Keywords

    • Activated carbon
    • cherry stones

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Materials Chemistry

    Cite this

    Lussier, M. G., Shull, J. C., & Miller, D. J. (1994). Activated carbon from cherry stones. Carbon, 32(8), 1493-1498. DOI: 10.1016/0008-6223(94)90144-9

    Activated carbon from cherry stones. / Lussier, Michael G.; Shull, Jeffrey C.; Miller, Dennis J.

    In: Carbon, Vol. 32, No. 8, 1994, p. 1493-1498.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Lussier, MG, Shull, JC & Miller, DJ 1994, 'Activated carbon from cherry stones' Carbon, vol 32, no. 8, pp. 1493-1498. DOI: 10.1016/0008-6223(94)90144-9
    Lussier MG, Shull JC, Miller DJ. Activated carbon from cherry stones. Carbon. 1994;32(8):1493-1498. Available from, DOI: 10.1016/0008-6223(94)90144-9

    Lussier, Michael G.; Shull, Jeffrey C.; Miller, Dennis J. / Activated carbon from cherry stones.

    In: Carbon, Vol. 32, No. 8, 1994, p. 1493-1498.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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