All biomass is local: Environmental impacts of ethanol derived from corn grain

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

This is a life cycle assessment study on the ethanol production system in which ethanol is derived from corn grain via wet milling. We investigate the effects of farming location on corn production environmental performance and find that performance varies significantly with location. Four wet milling plants in different are investigated. The functional unit is defined as one kg of ethanol. Ethanol is used as a liquid fuel in a midsize passenger vehicle in the form of E10 (a mixture of 10 % ethanol and 90 % gasoline by volume). The system boundary includes biomass production, transportation of biomass to a wet milling, wet milling process, transportation of ethanol to users, and ethanol fueled vehicle operation. The allocation procedures for external functions are done by the system expansion approach. Thus, the system boundary is expanded to include the avoided product systems (e.g., gasoline fueled vehicle operation, etc.). The potential impact categories considered here are nonrenewable energy consumption, natural resource use (e.g., coal, crude oil and natural gas), climate change, photochemical smog, acidification, and eutrophication. Environmental impacts are estimated by characterization factors given by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA-TRACI).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAIChE Annual Meeting, Conference Proceedings
Pages12095
Number of pages1
StatePublished - 2005
Externally publishedYes
Event05AIChE: 2005 AIChE Annual Meeting and Fall Showcase - Cincinnati, OH, United States

Other

Other05AIChE: 2005 AIChE Annual Meeting and Fall Showcase
CountryUnited States
CityCincinnati, OH
Period10/30/0511/4/05

Profile

Ethanol
Biomass
Gasoline
Environmental impact
Eutrophication
Acidification
Liquid fuels
Environmental Protection Agency
Natural resources
Climate change
Life cycle
Natural gas
Energy utilization
Crude oil
Coal

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Kim, S., & Dale, B. E. (2005). All biomass is local: Environmental impacts of ethanol derived from corn grain. In AIChE Annual Meeting, Conference Proceedings (pp. 12095)

All biomass is local : Environmental impacts of ethanol derived from corn grain. / Kim, Seungdo; Dale, Bruce E.

AIChE Annual Meeting, Conference Proceedings. 2005. p. 12095.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Kim, S & Dale, BE 2005, All biomass is local: Environmental impacts of ethanol derived from corn grain. in AIChE Annual Meeting, Conference Proceedings. pp. 12095, 05AIChE: 2005 AIChE Annual Meeting and Fall Showcase, Cincinnati, OH, United States, 30-4 November.
Kim S, Dale BE. All biomass is local: Environmental impacts of ethanol derived from corn grain. In AIChE Annual Meeting, Conference Proceedings. 2005. p. 12095.

Kim, Seungdo; Dale, Bruce E. / All biomass is local : Environmental impacts of ethanol derived from corn grain.

AIChE Annual Meeting, Conference Proceedings. 2005. p. 12095.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

@inbook{361e456b3e4a4d4394ae99322d2f5c23,
title = "All biomass is local: Environmental impacts of ethanol derived from corn grain",
abstract = "This is a life cycle assessment study on the ethanol production system in which ethanol is derived from corn grain via wet milling. We investigate the effects of farming location on corn production environmental performance and find that performance varies significantly with location. Four wet milling plants in different are investigated. The functional unit is defined as one kg of ethanol. Ethanol is used as a liquid fuel in a midsize passenger vehicle in the form of E10 (a mixture of 10 % ethanol and 90 % gasoline by volume). The system boundary includes biomass production, transportation of biomass to a wet milling, wet milling process, transportation of ethanol to users, and ethanol fueled vehicle operation. The allocation procedures for external functions are done by the system expansion approach. Thus, the system boundary is expanded to include the avoided product systems (e.g., gasoline fueled vehicle operation, etc.). The potential impact categories considered here are nonrenewable energy consumption, natural resource use (e.g., coal, crude oil and natural gas), climate change, photochemical smog, acidification, and eutrophication. Environmental impacts are estimated by characterization factors given by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA-TRACI).",
author = "Seungdo Kim and Dale, {Bruce E.}",
year = "2005",
pages = "12095",
booktitle = "AIChE Annual Meeting, Conference Proceedings",

}

TY - CHAP

T1 - All biomass is local

T2 - Environmental impacts of ethanol derived from corn grain

AU - Kim,Seungdo

AU - Dale,Bruce E.

PY - 2005

Y1 - 2005

N2 - This is a life cycle assessment study on the ethanol production system in which ethanol is derived from corn grain via wet milling. We investigate the effects of farming location on corn production environmental performance and find that performance varies significantly with location. Four wet milling plants in different are investigated. The functional unit is defined as one kg of ethanol. Ethanol is used as a liquid fuel in a midsize passenger vehicle in the form of E10 (a mixture of 10 % ethanol and 90 % gasoline by volume). The system boundary includes biomass production, transportation of biomass to a wet milling, wet milling process, transportation of ethanol to users, and ethanol fueled vehicle operation. The allocation procedures for external functions are done by the system expansion approach. Thus, the system boundary is expanded to include the avoided product systems (e.g., gasoline fueled vehicle operation, etc.). The potential impact categories considered here are nonrenewable energy consumption, natural resource use (e.g., coal, crude oil and natural gas), climate change, photochemical smog, acidification, and eutrophication. Environmental impacts are estimated by characterization factors given by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA-TRACI).

AB - This is a life cycle assessment study on the ethanol production system in which ethanol is derived from corn grain via wet milling. We investigate the effects of farming location on corn production environmental performance and find that performance varies significantly with location. Four wet milling plants in different are investigated. The functional unit is defined as one kg of ethanol. Ethanol is used as a liquid fuel in a midsize passenger vehicle in the form of E10 (a mixture of 10 % ethanol and 90 % gasoline by volume). The system boundary includes biomass production, transportation of biomass to a wet milling, wet milling process, transportation of ethanol to users, and ethanol fueled vehicle operation. The allocation procedures for external functions are done by the system expansion approach. Thus, the system boundary is expanded to include the avoided product systems (e.g., gasoline fueled vehicle operation, etc.). The potential impact categories considered here are nonrenewable energy consumption, natural resource use (e.g., coal, crude oil and natural gas), climate change, photochemical smog, acidification, and eutrophication. Environmental impacts are estimated by characterization factors given by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA-TRACI).

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33645636917&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33645636917&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Conference contribution

SP - 12095

BT - AIChE Annual Meeting, Conference Proceedings

ER -