Allocation procedure in multi-output process: An illustration of ISO 14041

S. Kim, M. Overcash

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • 23 Citations

Abstract

Allocation results for a multi-output process in a life cycle assessment study depend on the definition of the unit process which can vary with the depth of a study. The unit process may be a manufacturing site, a sub-process, or an operational unit (e.g. distillation column or reactor). There are three different approaches to define a unit process: Macroscopic approach, quasi-microscopic approach, and microscopic approach. In the macroscopic approach, a unit process is the manufacturing site, while a unit process in the quasi-microscopic approach is a sub-process of the manufacturing site. An operational unit becomes the unit process in the microscopic approach. In the quasi-microscopic and the microscopic approaches, a process can be subdivided into a joint process, a physically separated process which is physically apart from other processes, and a fully separated process. Each type can be a unit process. Therefore, the multi-output process in the quasi-microscopic and the microscopic approaches can be subdivided among two or more unit processes depending on the actual operations. The allocation in the fully separated process can be avoided because this process fulfills one function. In the joint process and the physically separated process, which deliver two or more functions, allocation is still required. Ammonia manufacturing, where carbon dioxide is formed as a byproduct is given to show a specific detailed example of the allocation procedure by subdivision in ISO 14041. It is shown that the quasi-microscopic and the microscopic approaches can reduce the multi-output allocation of a given chemical product. Furthermore, the quasi-microscopic and the microscopic approaches are very useful in identifying key pollution prevention issues related with one product or function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)221-228
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Life Cycle Assessment
Volume5
Issue number4
StatePublished - 2000
Externally publishedYes

Profile

manufacturing
Actinobacillosis
Chemical reactions
Aminoacridines
distillation
life cycle
ammonia
carbon dioxide
pollution
Alcuronium
Melanesia
Cytophotometry
Ancylostomatoidea
Byproducts
Distillation columns
Life cycle
Ammonia
Carbon dioxide
Pollution

Keywords

  • Allocation
  • Ammonia
  • Carbon dioxide
  • Life cycle assessment
  • Life cycle inventory analysis
  • Macroscopic approach
  • Microscopic approach
  • Multi-output process
  • Quasi-microscopic approach

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Environmental Chemistry

Cite this

Allocation procedure in multi-output process : An illustration of ISO 14041. / Kim, S.; Overcash, M.

In: International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, Vol. 5, No. 4, 2000, p. 221-228.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kim, S.; Overcash, M. / Allocation procedure in multi-output process : An illustration of ISO 14041.

In: International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, Vol. 5, No. 4, 2000, p. 221-228.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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