Altering the ratio of dietary palmitic, stearic, and oleic acids in diets with or without whole cottonseed affects nutrient digestibility, energy partitioning, and production responses of dairy cows

J. de Souza, C. L. Preseault, A. L. Lock

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

Abstract

The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of varying the ratio of dietary palmitic (C16:0), stearic (C18:0), and oleic (cis-9 C18:1) acids in basal diets containing soyhulls or whole cottonseed on nutrient digestibility, energy partitioning, and production response of lactating dairy cows. Twenty-four mid-lactation multiparous Holstein cows were used in a split-plot Latin square design. Cows were allocated to a main plot receiving either a basal diet with soyhulls (SH, n = 12) or a basal diet with whole cottonseed (CS, n = 12) that was fed throughout the experiment. Within each plot a 4 × 4 Latin square arrangement of treatments was used in 4 consecutive 21-d periods. Treatments were (1) control (CON; no supplemental fat), (2) high C16:0 supplement [PA; fatty acid (FA) supplement blend provided ~80% C16:0], (3) C16:0 and C18:0 supplement (PA+SA; FA supplement blend provided ~40% C16:0 + ~40% C18:0), and (4) C16:0 and cis-9 C18:1 supplement (PA+OA; FA supplement blend provided ~45% C16:0 + ~35% cis-9 C18:1). Interactions between basal diets and FA treatments were observed for dry matter intake (DMI) and milk yield. Among the SH diets, PA and PA+SA increased DMI compared with CON and PA+OA treatments, whereas in the CS diets PA+OA decreased DMI compared with CON. The PA, PA+SA, and PA+OA treatments increased milk yield compared with CON in the SH diets. The CS diets increased milk fat yield compared with the SH diets due to the greater yield of de novo and preformed milk FA. The PA treatment increased milk fat yield compared with CON, PA+SA, and PA+OA due to the greater yield of mixed-source (16-carbon) milk FA. The PA treatment increased 3.5% fat-corrected milk compared with CON and tended to increase it compared with PA+SA and PA+OA. The CS diets increased body weight (BW) change compared with the SH diets. Additionally, PA+OA tended to increase BW change compared with CON and PA and increased it in comparison with PA+SA. The PA and PA+OA treatments increased dry matter and neutral detergent fiber digestibility compared with PA+SA and tended to increase them compared with CON. The PA+SA treatment reduced 16-carbon, 18-carbon, and total FA digestibility compared with the other treatments. The CS diets increased energy partitioning toward body reserves compared with the SH diets. The PA treatment increased energy partitioning toward milk compared with CON and PA+OA and tended to increase it compared with PA+SA. In contrast, PA+OA increased energy partitioned to body reserves compared with PA and PA+SA and tended to increase it compared with CON. In conclusion, milk yield responses to different combinations of FA were affected by the addition of whole cottonseed in the diet. Among the combinations of C16:0, C18:0, and cis-9 C18:1 evaluated, fat supplements with more C16:0 increased energy output in milk, whereas fat supplements with more cis-9 C18:1 increased energy storage in BW. The combination of C16:0 and C18:0 reduced nutrient digestibility, which most likely explains the lower performance observed compared with other treatments.

LanguageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Dairy Science
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

Profile

cottonseed
digestible energy
stearic acid
palmitic acid
oleic acid
dairy cows
nutrients
diet
Stearic Acids
Cottonseed Oil
Diet
Food
Milk
Fatty Acids
fatty acids
Fats
energy
blended foods
dry matter intake
milk yield

Keywords

  • Dairy cow
  • Dietary fatty acid
  • Digestibility
  • Nutrient partitioning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Genetics

Cite this

@article{163dabd4aca14c27a54581ac3094ee14,
title = "Altering the ratio of dietary palmitic, stearic, and oleic acids in diets with or without whole cottonseed affects nutrient digestibility, energy partitioning, and production responses of dairy cows",
abstract = "The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of varying the ratio of dietary palmitic (C16:0), stearic (C18:0), and oleic (cis-9 C18:1) acids in basal diets containing soyhulls or whole cottonseed on nutrient digestibility, energy partitioning, and production response of lactating dairy cows. Twenty-four mid-lactation multiparous Holstein cows were used in a split-plot Latin square design. Cows were allocated to a main plot receiving either a basal diet with soyhulls (SH, n = 12) or a basal diet with whole cottonseed (CS, n = 12) that was fed throughout the experiment. Within each plot a 4 × 4 Latin square arrangement of treatments was used in 4 consecutive 21-d periods. Treatments were (1) control (CON; no supplemental fat), (2) high C16:0 supplement [PA; fatty acid (FA) supplement blend provided ~80% C16:0], (3) C16:0 and C18:0 supplement (PA+SA; FA supplement blend provided ~40% C16:0 + ~40% C18:0), and (4) C16:0 and cis-9 C18:1 supplement (PA+OA; FA supplement blend provided ~45% C16:0 + ~35% cis-9 C18:1). Interactions between basal diets and FA treatments were observed for dry matter intake (DMI) and milk yield. Among the SH diets, PA and PA+SA increased DMI compared with CON and PA+OA treatments, whereas in the CS diets PA+OA decreased DMI compared with CON. The PA, PA+SA, and PA+OA treatments increased milk yield compared with CON in the SH diets. The CS diets increased milk fat yield compared with the SH diets due to the greater yield of de novo and preformed milk FA. The PA treatment increased milk fat yield compared with CON, PA+SA, and PA+OA due to the greater yield of mixed-source (16-carbon) milk FA. The PA treatment increased 3.5% fat-corrected milk compared with CON and tended to increase it compared with PA+SA and PA+OA. The CS diets increased body weight (BW) change compared with the SH diets. Additionally, PA+OA tended to increase BW change compared with CON and PA and increased it in comparison with PA+SA. The PA and PA+OA treatments increased dry matter and neutral detergent fiber digestibility compared with PA+SA and tended to increase them compared with CON. The PA+SA treatment reduced 16-carbon, 18-carbon, and total FA digestibility compared with the other treatments. The CS diets increased energy partitioning toward body reserves compared with the SH diets. The PA treatment increased energy partitioning toward milk compared with CON and PA+OA and tended to increase it compared with PA+SA. In contrast, PA+OA increased energy partitioned to body reserves compared with PA and PA+SA and tended to increase it compared with CON. In conclusion, milk yield responses to different combinations of FA were affected by the addition of whole cottonseed in the diet. Among the combinations of C16:0, C18:0, and cis-9 C18:1 evaluated, fat supplements with more C16:0 increased energy output in milk, whereas fat supplements with more cis-9 C18:1 increased energy storage in BW. The combination of C16:0 and C18:0 reduced nutrient digestibility, which most likely explains the lower performance observed compared with other treatments.",
keywords = "Dairy cow, Dietary fatty acid, Digestibility, Nutrient partitioning",
author = "{de Souza}, J. and Preseault, {C. L.} and Lock, {A. L.}",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
doi = "10.3168/jds.2017-13460",
journal = "Journal of Dairy Science",
issn = "0022-0302",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Altering the ratio of dietary palmitic, stearic, and oleic acids in diets with or without whole cottonseed affects nutrient digestibility, energy partitioning, and production responses of dairy cows

AU - de Souza,J.

AU - Preseault,C. L.

AU - Lock,A. L.

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of varying the ratio of dietary palmitic (C16:0), stearic (C18:0), and oleic (cis-9 C18:1) acids in basal diets containing soyhulls or whole cottonseed on nutrient digestibility, energy partitioning, and production response of lactating dairy cows. Twenty-four mid-lactation multiparous Holstein cows were used in a split-plot Latin square design. Cows were allocated to a main plot receiving either a basal diet with soyhulls (SH, n = 12) or a basal diet with whole cottonseed (CS, n = 12) that was fed throughout the experiment. Within each plot a 4 × 4 Latin square arrangement of treatments was used in 4 consecutive 21-d periods. Treatments were (1) control (CON; no supplemental fat), (2) high C16:0 supplement [PA; fatty acid (FA) supplement blend provided ~80% C16:0], (3) C16:0 and C18:0 supplement (PA+SA; FA supplement blend provided ~40% C16:0 + ~40% C18:0), and (4) C16:0 and cis-9 C18:1 supplement (PA+OA; FA supplement blend provided ~45% C16:0 + ~35% cis-9 C18:1). Interactions between basal diets and FA treatments were observed for dry matter intake (DMI) and milk yield. Among the SH diets, PA and PA+SA increased DMI compared with CON and PA+OA treatments, whereas in the CS diets PA+OA decreased DMI compared with CON. The PA, PA+SA, and PA+OA treatments increased milk yield compared with CON in the SH diets. The CS diets increased milk fat yield compared with the SH diets due to the greater yield of de novo and preformed milk FA. The PA treatment increased milk fat yield compared with CON, PA+SA, and PA+OA due to the greater yield of mixed-source (16-carbon) milk FA. The PA treatment increased 3.5% fat-corrected milk compared with CON and tended to increase it compared with PA+SA and PA+OA. The CS diets increased body weight (BW) change compared with the SH diets. Additionally, PA+OA tended to increase BW change compared with CON and PA and increased it in comparison with PA+SA. The PA and PA+OA treatments increased dry matter and neutral detergent fiber digestibility compared with PA+SA and tended to increase them compared with CON. The PA+SA treatment reduced 16-carbon, 18-carbon, and total FA digestibility compared with the other treatments. The CS diets increased energy partitioning toward body reserves compared with the SH diets. The PA treatment increased energy partitioning toward milk compared with CON and PA+OA and tended to increase it compared with PA+SA. In contrast, PA+OA increased energy partitioned to body reserves compared with PA and PA+SA and tended to increase it compared with CON. In conclusion, milk yield responses to different combinations of FA were affected by the addition of whole cottonseed in the diet. Among the combinations of C16:0, C18:0, and cis-9 C18:1 evaluated, fat supplements with more C16:0 increased energy output in milk, whereas fat supplements with more cis-9 C18:1 increased energy storage in BW. The combination of C16:0 and C18:0 reduced nutrient digestibility, which most likely explains the lower performance observed compared with other treatments.

AB - The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of varying the ratio of dietary palmitic (C16:0), stearic (C18:0), and oleic (cis-9 C18:1) acids in basal diets containing soyhulls or whole cottonseed on nutrient digestibility, energy partitioning, and production response of lactating dairy cows. Twenty-four mid-lactation multiparous Holstein cows were used in a split-plot Latin square design. Cows were allocated to a main plot receiving either a basal diet with soyhulls (SH, n = 12) or a basal diet with whole cottonseed (CS, n = 12) that was fed throughout the experiment. Within each plot a 4 × 4 Latin square arrangement of treatments was used in 4 consecutive 21-d periods. Treatments were (1) control (CON; no supplemental fat), (2) high C16:0 supplement [PA; fatty acid (FA) supplement blend provided ~80% C16:0], (3) C16:0 and C18:0 supplement (PA+SA; FA supplement blend provided ~40% C16:0 + ~40% C18:0), and (4) C16:0 and cis-9 C18:1 supplement (PA+OA; FA supplement blend provided ~45% C16:0 + ~35% cis-9 C18:1). Interactions between basal diets and FA treatments were observed for dry matter intake (DMI) and milk yield. Among the SH diets, PA and PA+SA increased DMI compared with CON and PA+OA treatments, whereas in the CS diets PA+OA decreased DMI compared with CON. The PA, PA+SA, and PA+OA treatments increased milk yield compared with CON in the SH diets. The CS diets increased milk fat yield compared with the SH diets due to the greater yield of de novo and preformed milk FA. The PA treatment increased milk fat yield compared with CON, PA+SA, and PA+OA due to the greater yield of mixed-source (16-carbon) milk FA. The PA treatment increased 3.5% fat-corrected milk compared with CON and tended to increase it compared with PA+SA and PA+OA. The CS diets increased body weight (BW) change compared with the SH diets. Additionally, PA+OA tended to increase BW change compared with CON and PA and increased it in comparison with PA+SA. The PA and PA+OA treatments increased dry matter and neutral detergent fiber digestibility compared with PA+SA and tended to increase them compared with CON. The PA+SA treatment reduced 16-carbon, 18-carbon, and total FA digestibility compared with the other treatments. The CS diets increased energy partitioning toward body reserves compared with the SH diets. The PA treatment increased energy partitioning toward milk compared with CON and PA+OA and tended to increase it compared with PA+SA. In contrast, PA+OA increased energy partitioned to body reserves compared with PA and PA+SA and tended to increase it compared with CON. In conclusion, milk yield responses to different combinations of FA were affected by the addition of whole cottonseed in the diet. Among the combinations of C16:0, C18:0, and cis-9 C18:1 evaluated, fat supplements with more C16:0 increased energy output in milk, whereas fat supplements with more cis-9 C18:1 increased energy storage in BW. The combination of C16:0 and C18:0 reduced nutrient digestibility, which most likely explains the lower performance observed compared with other treatments.

KW - Dairy cow

KW - Dietary fatty acid

KW - Digestibility

KW - Nutrient partitioning

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DO - 10.3168/jds.2017-13460

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