Aqueous phase catalytic hydrogenation of organic acids

Jennifer E. Farrugia, James E. Jackson, Dennis J. Miller

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Many industrially important chemicals are currently produced using petroleum and natural gas as feedstocks, which are finite and nonrenewable. Organic acids compose a major class of renewable-resource feedstock chemicals. Condensed-phase catalytic hydrogenation of organic carboxylic acids as a route to alcohols was investigated as a possible pathway to novel, high-valued products. Organic acids bearing a different vicinal functional group, had varying reactivity in catalytic hydrogenation. Protonated alanine and lactic acid underwent aqueous-phase hydrogenation over a carbon-supported ruthenium catalyst ∼ 10 and 2-3 times as fast as their unsubstituted, propanoic acid.. The effects on organic acids' reactivity and selectivity toward hydrogenation were examined by comparing reduction rates over a wider range of electron-withdrawing, hydrogen-bonding, or sterically bulky vicinal substituents. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the 227th ACS National Meeting (Anaheim, CA 3/28/2004-4/1/2004).

LanguageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationACS National Meeting Book of Abstracts
Volume227
Edition1
StatePublished - 2004
Event227th ACS National Meeting Abstracts of Papers - Anaheim, CA., United States
Duration: Mar 28 2004Apr 1 2004

Other

Other227th ACS National Meeting Abstracts of Papers
CountryUnited States
CityAnaheim, CA.
Period3/28/044/1/04

Profile

Organic acids
Hydrogenation
Feedstocks
Bearings (structural)
Ruthenium
Petroleum
Carboxylic Acids
Alanine
Functional groups
Lactic Acid
Natural gas
Hydrogen bonds
Carbon
Alcohols
Catalysts
Electrons

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)

Cite this

Farrugia, J. E., Jackson, J. E., & Miller, D. J. (2004). Aqueous phase catalytic hydrogenation of organic acids. In ACS National Meeting Book of Abstracts (1 ed., Vol. 227)

Aqueous phase catalytic hydrogenation of organic acids. / Farrugia, Jennifer E.; Jackson, James E.; Miller, Dennis J.

ACS National Meeting Book of Abstracts. Vol. 227 1. ed. 2004.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Farrugia, JE, Jackson, JE & Miller, DJ 2004, Aqueous phase catalytic hydrogenation of organic acids. in ACS National Meeting Book of Abstracts. 1 edn, vol. 227, 227th ACS National Meeting Abstracts of Papers, Anaheim, CA., United States, 3/28/04.
Farrugia JE, Jackson JE, Miller DJ. Aqueous phase catalytic hydrogenation of organic acids. In ACS National Meeting Book of Abstracts. 1 ed. Vol. 227. 2004.
Farrugia, Jennifer E. ; Jackson, James E. ; Miller, Dennis J./ Aqueous phase catalytic hydrogenation of organic acids. ACS National Meeting Book of Abstracts. Vol. 227 1. ed. 2004.
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