Are twelve step programs appropriate for disenfranchised groups? Evidence from a study of posttreatment mutual help involvement

K. Humphreys, B. E. Mavis, B. E. Stoffelmayr

    Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

    • 31 Citations

    Abstract

    Conventional wisdom about 12 step mutual help programs for substance abusers holds that these organizations appeal primarily to white, middle class men. To investigate the validity of this claim, a sample of 558 persons who were followed up one year after their intake to substance abuse treatment was studied. Contrary to conventional wisdom, the 178 persons who were attending mutual help after treatment were not significantly different from the 380 who were not, on race, gender, education, employment pattern, or marital status. Supplemental analyses of the data suggested that women are more likely to drop out of 12 step groups than are men and that African Americans who attend self-help after treatment have better outcomes on clinical and social measures than do African Americans who do not attend serf-help groups. Overall the findings suggest that 12 step programs both appeal to and benefit disenfranchised groups.

    LanguageEnglish (US)
    Pages165-179
    Number of pages15
    JournalPrevention in Human Services
    Volume11
    Issue number1
    StatePublished - 1994

    Profile

    Therapeutics
    African Americans
    Marital Status
    Substance-Related Disorders
    Organizations
    Education

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
    • Leadership and Management

    Cite this

    Are twelve step programs appropriate for disenfranchised groups? Evidence from a study of posttreatment mutual help involvement. / Humphreys, K.; Mavis, B. E.; Stoffelmayr, B. E.

    In: Prevention in Human Services, Vol. 11, No. 1, 1994, p. 165-179.

    Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

    @article{880c972227bf4c14ba06d69af8443ce5,
    title = "Are twelve step programs appropriate for disenfranchised groups? Evidence from a study of posttreatment mutual help involvement",
    abstract = "Conventional wisdom about 12 step mutual help programs for substance abusers holds that these organizations appeal primarily to white, middle class men. To investigate the validity of this claim, a sample of 558 persons who were followed up one year after their intake to substance abuse treatment was studied. Contrary to conventional wisdom, the 178 persons who were attending mutual help after treatment were not significantly different from the 380 who were not, on race, gender, education, employment pattern, or marital status. Supplemental analyses of the data suggested that women are more likely to drop out of 12 step groups than are men and that African Americans who attend self-help after treatment have better outcomes on clinical and social measures than do African Americans who do not attend serf-help groups. Overall the findings suggest that 12 step programs both appeal to and benefit disenfranchised groups.",
    author = "K. Humphreys and Mavis, {B. E.} and Stoffelmayr, {B. E.}",
    year = "1994",
    volume = "11",
    pages = "165--179",
    journal = "Journal of Prevention and Intervention in the Community",
    issn = "1085-2352",
    publisher = "Routledge",
    number = "1",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Are twelve step programs appropriate for disenfranchised groups? Evidence from a study of posttreatment mutual help involvement

    AU - Humphreys,K.

    AU - Mavis,B. E.

    AU - Stoffelmayr,B. E.

    PY - 1994

    Y1 - 1994

    N2 - Conventional wisdom about 12 step mutual help programs for substance abusers holds that these organizations appeal primarily to white, middle class men. To investigate the validity of this claim, a sample of 558 persons who were followed up one year after their intake to substance abuse treatment was studied. Contrary to conventional wisdom, the 178 persons who were attending mutual help after treatment were not significantly different from the 380 who were not, on race, gender, education, employment pattern, or marital status. Supplemental analyses of the data suggested that women are more likely to drop out of 12 step groups than are men and that African Americans who attend self-help after treatment have better outcomes on clinical and social measures than do African Americans who do not attend serf-help groups. Overall the findings suggest that 12 step programs both appeal to and benefit disenfranchised groups.

    AB - Conventional wisdom about 12 step mutual help programs for substance abusers holds that these organizations appeal primarily to white, middle class men. To investigate the validity of this claim, a sample of 558 persons who were followed up one year after their intake to substance abuse treatment was studied. Contrary to conventional wisdom, the 178 persons who were attending mutual help after treatment were not significantly different from the 380 who were not, on race, gender, education, employment pattern, or marital status. Supplemental analyses of the data suggested that women are more likely to drop out of 12 step groups than are men and that African Americans who attend self-help after treatment have better outcomes on clinical and social measures than do African Americans who do not attend serf-help groups. Overall the findings suggest that 12 step programs both appeal to and benefit disenfranchised groups.

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0028674226&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0028674226&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    M3 - Article

    VL - 11

    SP - 165

    EP - 179

    JO - Journal of Prevention and Intervention in the Community

    T2 - Journal of Prevention and Intervention in the Community

    JF - Journal of Prevention and Intervention in the Community

    SN - 1085-2352

    IS - 1

    ER -