Arts and Crafts: Critical to Economic Innovation

Rex LaMore, Robert Root-Bernstein, Michele Root-Bernstein, John H. Schweitzer, James L. Lawton, Eileen Roraback, Amber Peruski, Megan VanDyke, Laleah Fernandez

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

  • 10 Citations

Abstract

Governments, schools, and other nonprofit organizations are engaged in critical budget decisions that may affect our economic development success. The assumption is that arts and crafts are dispensable extras. Research suggests, however, that disposing of arts and crafts may have negative consequences for the country's ability to produce innovative scientists and engineers who invent patentable products and found new companies. A study of Michigan State University Honors College science and technology graduates (1990-1995) yielded four striking results: (a) graduates majoring in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) subjects are far more likely to have extensive arts and crafts skills than the average American; (b) arts and crafts experiences are significantly correlated with producing patentable inventions and founding new companies; (c) the majority believe that their innovative ability is stimulated by their arts and crafts knowledge; and (d) lifelong participation and exposure in the arts and crafts yields the most significant impacts for innovators and entrepreneurs.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages221-229
Number of pages9
JournalEconomic Development Quarterly
Volume27
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2013

Profile

art
innovation
economics
craft
Art
Economics
Innovation
graduate
ability
science
nonprofit organization
entrepreneur
mathematics
science and technology
economic development
engineering
participation
exposure
budget
school

Keywords

  • arts
  • creativity
  • innovation
  • STEM

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Development
  • Urban Studies

Cite this

LaMore, R., Root-Bernstein, R., Root-Bernstein, M., Schweitzer, J. H., Lawton, J. L., Roraback, E., ... Fernandez, L. (2013). Arts and Crafts: Critical to Economic Innovation. Economic Development Quarterly, 27(3), 221-229. DOI: 10.1177/0891242413486186

Arts and Crafts : Critical to Economic Innovation. / LaMore, Rex; Root-Bernstein, Robert; Root-Bernstein, Michele; Schweitzer, John H.; Lawton, James L.; Roraback, Eileen; Peruski, Amber; VanDyke, Megan; Fernandez, Laleah.

In: Economic Development Quarterly, Vol. 27, No. 3, 08.2013, p. 221-229.

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

LaMore, R, Root-Bernstein, R, Root-Bernstein, M, Schweitzer, JH, Lawton, JL, Roraback, E, Peruski, A, VanDyke, M & Fernandez, L 2013, 'Arts and Crafts: Critical to Economic Innovation' Economic Development Quarterly, vol 27, no. 3, pp. 221-229. DOI: 10.1177/0891242413486186
LaMore R, Root-Bernstein R, Root-Bernstein M, Schweitzer JH, Lawton JL, Roraback E et al. Arts and Crafts: Critical to Economic Innovation. Economic Development Quarterly. 2013 Aug;27(3):221-229. Available from, DOI: 10.1177/0891242413486186
LaMore, Rex ; Root-Bernstein, Robert ; Root-Bernstein, Michele ; Schweitzer, John H. ; Lawton, James L. ; Roraback, Eileen ; Peruski, Amber ; VanDyke, Megan ; Fernandez, Laleah. / Arts and Crafts : Critical to Economic Innovation. In: Economic Development Quarterly. 2013 ; Vol. 27, No. 3. pp. 221-229
@article{d233e54834704283bb5c987b581f69c8,
title = "Arts and Crafts: Critical to Economic Innovation",
abstract = "Governments, schools, and other nonprofit organizations are engaged in critical budget decisions that may affect our economic development success. The assumption is that arts and crafts are dispensable extras. Research suggests, however, that disposing of arts and crafts may have negative consequences for the country's ability to produce innovative scientists and engineers who invent patentable products and found new companies. A study of Michigan State University Honors College science and technology graduates (1990-1995) yielded four striking results: (a) graduates majoring in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) subjects are far more likely to have extensive arts and crafts skills than the average American; (b) arts and crafts experiences are significantly correlated with producing patentable inventions and founding new companies; (c) the majority believe that their innovative ability is stimulated by their arts and crafts knowledge; and (d) lifelong participation and exposure in the arts and crafts yields the most significant impacts for innovators and entrepreneurs.",
keywords = "arts, creativity, innovation, STEM",
author = "Rex LaMore and Robert Root-Bernstein and Michele Root-Bernstein and Schweitzer, {John H.} and Lawton, {James L.} and Eileen Roraback and Amber Peruski and Megan VanDyke and Laleah Fernandez",
year = "2013",
month = "8",
doi = "10.1177/0891242413486186",
volume = "27",
pages = "221--229",
journal = "Economic Development Quarterly",
issn = "0891-2424",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Arts and Crafts

T2 - Economic Development Quarterly

AU - LaMore,Rex

AU - Root-Bernstein,Robert

AU - Root-Bernstein,Michele

AU - Schweitzer,John H.

AU - Lawton,James L.

AU - Roraback,Eileen

AU - Peruski,Amber

AU - VanDyke,Megan

AU - Fernandez,Laleah

PY - 2013/8

Y1 - 2013/8

N2 - Governments, schools, and other nonprofit organizations are engaged in critical budget decisions that may affect our economic development success. The assumption is that arts and crafts are dispensable extras. Research suggests, however, that disposing of arts and crafts may have negative consequences for the country's ability to produce innovative scientists and engineers who invent patentable products and found new companies. A study of Michigan State University Honors College science and technology graduates (1990-1995) yielded four striking results: (a) graduates majoring in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) subjects are far more likely to have extensive arts and crafts skills than the average American; (b) arts and crafts experiences are significantly correlated with producing patentable inventions and founding new companies; (c) the majority believe that their innovative ability is stimulated by their arts and crafts knowledge; and (d) lifelong participation and exposure in the arts and crafts yields the most significant impacts for innovators and entrepreneurs.

AB - Governments, schools, and other nonprofit organizations are engaged in critical budget decisions that may affect our economic development success. The assumption is that arts and crafts are dispensable extras. Research suggests, however, that disposing of arts and crafts may have negative consequences for the country's ability to produce innovative scientists and engineers who invent patentable products and found new companies. A study of Michigan State University Honors College science and technology graduates (1990-1995) yielded four striking results: (a) graduates majoring in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) subjects are far more likely to have extensive arts and crafts skills than the average American; (b) arts and crafts experiences are significantly correlated with producing patentable inventions and founding new companies; (c) the majority believe that their innovative ability is stimulated by their arts and crafts knowledge; and (d) lifelong participation and exposure in the arts and crafts yields the most significant impacts for innovators and entrepreneurs.

KW - arts

KW - creativity

KW - innovation

KW - STEM

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84880477065&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84880477065&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/0891242413486186

DO - 10.1177/0891242413486186

M3 - Article

VL - 27

SP - 221

EP - 229

JO - Economic Development Quarterly

JF - Economic Development Quarterly

SN - 0891-2424

IS - 3

ER -