Augmenting protein release from layer-by-layer functionalized agarose hydrogels

Daniel Lynam, Chelsea Peterson, Ryan Maloney, Dena Shahriari, Alexa Garrison, Sara Saleh, Sumit Mehrotra, Christina Chan, Jeff Sakamoto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • 9 Citations

Abstract

Recent work demonstrated the efficacy of combining layer-by-layer assembly with hydrogels to provide the controlled delivery of proteins for use in nerve repair scaffolds. In this work, we augmented the protein dose response by controlling and increasing the hydrogel internal surface area. Sucrose was added to agarose during gelation to homogenize the nanopore morphology, resulting in increased surface area per unit volume of hydrogel. The surface area of a range of compositions (1.5-5.0 wt% agarose and 0, 50 and 65 wt% sucrose) was measured. Gels were supercritically dried to preserve porosity enabling detailed pore morphology measurements using nitrogen adsorption and high resolution scanning electron microscopy. The resulting surface area, normalized by superficial gel volume, ranged between 6 m2/cm3gel and 56 m2/cm3gel. Using the layer-by-layer process to load lysozyme, a neurotrophic factor analog, a relationship was observed between surface area and cumulative dose response ranging from 176 to 2556 μg/mL, which is in the range of clinical relevance for the delivery of growth factors. In this work, we demonstrated that the ability to control porosity is key in tuning drug delivery dose response from layer-by-layer modified hydrogels.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages377-384
Number of pages8
JournalCarbohydrate Polymers
Volume103
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 15 2014

Profile

Hydrogels
Sepharose
Proteins
Gels
Hydrogel
Sugar (sucrose)
Sucrose
Porosity
Nanopores
High resolution electron microscopy
Nerve Growth Factors
Gelation
Scaffolds (biology)
Muramidase
Drug delivery
Scaffolds
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
Repair
Nitrogen
Enzymes

Keywords

  • Controlled drug release
  • Hydrogel
  • Layer-by-layer
  • Pore refinement
  • Surface area

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Organic Chemistry
  • Materials Chemistry
  • Polymers and Plastics

Cite this

Lynam, D., Peterson, C., Maloney, R., Shahriari, D., Garrison, A., Saleh, S., ... Sakamoto, J. (2014). Augmenting protein release from layer-by-layer functionalized agarose hydrogels. Carbohydrate Polymers, 103(1), 377-384. DOI: 10.1016/j.carbpol.2013.12.069

Augmenting protein release from layer-by-layer functionalized agarose hydrogels. / Lynam, Daniel; Peterson, Chelsea; Maloney, Ryan; Shahriari, Dena; Garrison, Alexa; Saleh, Sara; Mehrotra, Sumit; Chan, Christina; Sakamoto, Jeff.

In: Carbohydrate Polymers, Vol. 103, No. 1, 15.03.2014, p. 377-384.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lynam, D, Peterson, C, Maloney, R, Shahriari, D, Garrison, A, Saleh, S, Mehrotra, S, Chan, C & Sakamoto, J 2014, 'Augmenting protein release from layer-by-layer functionalized agarose hydrogels' Carbohydrate Polymers, vol 103, no. 1, pp. 377-384. DOI: 10.1016/j.carbpol.2013.12.069
Lynam D, Peterson C, Maloney R, Shahriari D, Garrison A, Saleh S et al. Augmenting protein release from layer-by-layer functionalized agarose hydrogels. Carbohydrate Polymers. 2014 Mar 15;103(1):377-384. Available from, DOI: 10.1016/j.carbpol.2013.12.069
Lynam, Daniel ; Peterson, Chelsea ; Maloney, Ryan ; Shahriari, Dena ; Garrison, Alexa ; Saleh, Sara ; Mehrotra, Sumit ; Chan, Christina ; Sakamoto, Jeff. / Augmenting protein release from layer-by-layer functionalized agarose hydrogels. In: Carbohydrate Polymers. 2014 ; Vol. 103, No. 1. pp. 377-384
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