Biobased industrial products from soybean biorefinery

E. Hablot, D. Graiver, R. Narayan

    Research output: ResearchConference contribution

    Abstract

    The use of biomass as raw materials for the production of fuels and chemicals to displace fossil resources has been the focus of many research activities in recent years. These activities are motivated by the desire for a sustainable resource supply, enhanced national security, and macroeconomic benefits for rural communities and the society at large. The use of plastic materials in the modern world has been increasing rapidly due to the relatively low cost of production and specific set of properties that can be derived from them. Until recently crude oil was the major source of these basic chemicals and value-added polymeric materials. Sustainable economics requires a similar wide range of processes that can utilize every component of these renewable resources. In our work with soybeans, we have used all parts of the bean (meal, oil and hulls) as a source of materials that can be converted economically to value-added products. The focus of this paper is to provide a few examples of this biorefinery concept that includes a catalyzed ozonation process of oil triglycerides to produce polyols, the conversion process of proteins in the meal to rigid polyurethane foams and the production of isocyanate-free polyurethanes from dimer acids. We will also review a novel silylation process that yields moisture activated RTV coatings from vegetable oils.

    LanguageEnglish (US)
    Title of host publicationACS Symposium Series
    PublisherAmerican Chemical Society
    Pages305-329
    Number of pages25
    Volume1144
    ISBN (Print)9780841228955
    DOIs
    StatePublished - 2013

    Publication series

    NameACS Symposium Series
    Volume1144
    ISSN (Print)00976156
    ISSN (Electronic)19475918

    Profile

    Polyurethanes
    Oils
    Ozonization
    National security
    Vegetable oils
    Polyols
    Dimers
    Foams
    Raw materials
    Biomass
    Moisture
    Crude oil
    Plastics
    Proteins
    Coatings
    Economics
    Acids
    Polymers
    Costs
    Triglycerides

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Chemistry(all)
    • Chemical Engineering(all)

    Cite this

    Hablot, E., Graiver, D., & Narayan, R. (2013). Biobased industrial products from soybean biorefinery. In ACS Symposium Series (Vol. 1144, pp. 305-329). (ACS Symposium Series; Vol. 1144). American Chemical Society. DOI: 10.1021/bk-2013-1144.ch021

    Biobased industrial products from soybean biorefinery. / Hablot, E.; Graiver, D.; Narayan, R.

    ACS Symposium Series. Vol. 1144 American Chemical Society, 2013. p. 305-329 (ACS Symposium Series; Vol. 1144).

    Research output: ResearchConference contribution

    Hablot, E, Graiver, D & Narayan, R 2013, Biobased industrial products from soybean biorefinery. in ACS Symposium Series. vol. 1144, ACS Symposium Series, vol. 1144, American Chemical Society, pp. 305-329. DOI: 10.1021/bk-2013-1144.ch021
    Hablot E, Graiver D, Narayan R. Biobased industrial products from soybean biorefinery. In ACS Symposium Series. Vol. 1144. American Chemical Society. 2013. p. 305-329. (ACS Symposium Series). Available from, DOI: 10.1021/bk-2013-1144.ch021
    Hablot, E. ; Graiver, D. ; Narayan, R./ Biobased industrial products from soybean biorefinery. ACS Symposium Series. Vol. 1144 American Chemical Society, 2013. pp. 305-329 (ACS Symposium Series).
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