Biodegradable, polymer encapsulated, metal oxide particles for MRI-based cell tracking

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • 13 Citations

Abstract

Metallic particles have shaped the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for molecular and cellular imaging. Although these particles have generally been developed for extracellular residence, either as blood pool contrast agents or targeted contrast agents, the coopted use of these particles for intracellular labeling has grown over the last 20 years. Coincident with this growth has been the development of metal oxide particles specifically intended for intracellular residence, and innovations in the nature of the metallic core. One promising nanoparticle construct for MRI-based cell tracking is polymer encapsulated metal oxide nanoparticles. Rather than a polymer coated metal oxide nanocrystal of the core: shell type, polymer encapsulated metal oxide nanoparticles cluster many nanocrystals within a polymer matrix. This nanoparticle composite more efficiently packages inorganic nanocrystals, affording the ability to label cells with more inorganic material. Further, for magnetic nanocrystals, the clustering of multiple magnetic nanocrystals within a single nanoparticle enhances r2 and r2 relaxivity. Methods for fabricating polymer encapsulated metal oxide nanoparticles are facile, yielding both varied compositions and synthetic approaches. This review presents a brief history into the use of metal oxide particles for MRI-based cell tracking and details the development and use of biodegradable, polymer encapsulated, metal oxide nanoparticles and microparticles for MRI-based cell tracking.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages376-389
Number of pages14
JournalMagnetic Resonance in Medicine
Volume73
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Profile

Cell Tracking
Metal Nanoparticles
Nanoparticles
Oxides
Polymers
Metals
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Contrast Media
Molecular Imaging
Cluster Analysis
History
Growth

Keywords

  • Iron oxide
  • MRI
  • Particles
  • Polymer
  • Stem cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Biodegradable, polymer encapsulated, metal oxide particles for MRI-based cell tracking. / Shapiro, Erik M.

In: Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, Vol. 73, No. 1, 01.01.2015, p. 376-389.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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