Bis(2-ethylhexyl) succinate in mixtures with epoxidized soybean oil as bio-based plasticizers for poly(vinylchloride)

Bharat Indu Chaudhary, Buu Dang Nguyen, Patrick Smith, Nse Sunday, Michael Luong, Alek Zamanskiy

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

  • 5 Citations

Abstract

Mixtures of bis(2-ethylhexyl) succinate and epoxidized soybean oil (ESO) have been evaluated as bio-based plasticizers for poly(vinylchloride). The rate of absorption of the bioplasticizers and their mixtures in the polymer was fast and, unlike that of petroleum-derived plasticizers, did not vary significantly with molecular weight. These bio-derived plasticizers and their mixtures were compatible with the polymer even at high loadings. The succinate was the most volatile and efficient plasticizer, but on heat aging of the polymer compositions, it also had the greatest deleterious effects. Diffusion coefficients and apparent activation energies of formulations containing bioplasticizer mixtures were controlled by the more volatile succinate. Mixtures comprising up to 50 wt% of the succinate yielded acceptably high-tensile properties after thermal aging as well as better plasticization efficiency than the epoxy bioplasticizer. Although the succinate resulted in inferior volume resistivity of the polymer compositions, improvements were obtained with increasing proportions of the epoxidized derivative in plasticizer mixtures. Melt state viscosity-shear rate curves of compositions containing dioctyl succinate (DOS) were similar to those made with two of the petroleum-derived plasticizers, but a DOS/ESO mixture yielded extended non-Newtonian behavior at low-shear rates. POLYM. ENG. SCI., 55:634-640, 2015.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages634-640
Number of pages7
JournalPolymer Engineering and Science
Volume55
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

Profile

Plasticizers
Succinic Acid
epoxidized soybean oil
Soybean oil
Polymers
Chemical analysis
Petroleum
Shear deformation
Crude oil
Thermal aging
Tensile properties
Activation energy
Aging of materials
Molecular weight
Derivatives
Hot Temperature
Viscosity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Polymers and Plastics
  • Materials Chemistry
  • Chemistry(all)

Cite this

Bis(2-ethylhexyl) succinate in mixtures with epoxidized soybean oil as bio-based plasticizers for poly(vinylchloride). / Chaudhary, Bharat Indu; Nguyen, Buu Dang; Smith, Patrick; Sunday, Nse; Luong, Michael; Zamanskiy, Alek.

In: Polymer Engineering and Science, Vol. 55, No. 3, 01.03.2015, p. 634-640.

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

Chaudhary, Bharat Indu ; Nguyen, Buu Dang ; Smith, Patrick ; Sunday, Nse ; Luong, Michael ; Zamanskiy, Alek. / Bis(2-ethylhexyl) succinate in mixtures with epoxidized soybean oil as bio-based plasticizers for poly(vinylchloride). In: Polymer Engineering and Science. 2015 ; Vol. 55, No. 3. pp. 634-640
@article{86e56076ff5a49259f13c89cd506305a,
title = "Bis(2-ethylhexyl) succinate in mixtures with epoxidized soybean oil as bio-based plasticizers for poly(vinylchloride)",
abstract = "Mixtures of bis(2-ethylhexyl) succinate and epoxidized soybean oil (ESO) have been evaluated as bio-based plasticizers for poly(vinylchloride). The rate of absorption of the bioplasticizers and their mixtures in the polymer was fast and, unlike that of petroleum-derived plasticizers, did not vary significantly with molecular weight. These bio-derived plasticizers and their mixtures were compatible with the polymer even at high loadings. The succinate was the most volatile and efficient plasticizer, but on heat aging of the polymer compositions, it also had the greatest deleterious effects. Diffusion coefficients and apparent activation energies of formulations containing bioplasticizer mixtures were controlled by the more volatile succinate. Mixtures comprising up to 50 wt% of the succinate yielded acceptably high-tensile properties after thermal aging as well as better plasticization efficiency than the epoxy bioplasticizer. Although the succinate resulted in inferior volume resistivity of the polymer compositions, improvements were obtained with increasing proportions of the epoxidized derivative in plasticizer mixtures. Melt state viscosity-shear rate curves of compositions containing dioctyl succinate (DOS) were similar to those made with two of the petroleum-derived plasticizers, but a DOS/ESO mixture yielded extended non-Newtonian behavior at low-shear rates. POLYM. ENG. SCI., 55:634-640, 2015.",
author = "Chaudhary, {Bharat Indu} and Nguyen, {Buu Dang} and Patrick Smith and Nse Sunday and Michael Luong and Alek Zamanskiy",
year = "2015",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1002/pen.23934",
volume = "55",
pages = "634--640",
journal = "Polymer Engineering and Science",
issn = "0032-3888",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Inc.",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Bis(2-ethylhexyl) succinate in mixtures with epoxidized soybean oil as bio-based plasticizers for poly(vinylchloride)

AU - Chaudhary,Bharat Indu

AU - Nguyen,Buu Dang

AU - Smith,Patrick

AU - Sunday,Nse

AU - Luong,Michael

AU - Zamanskiy,Alek

PY - 2015/3/1

Y1 - 2015/3/1

N2 - Mixtures of bis(2-ethylhexyl) succinate and epoxidized soybean oil (ESO) have been evaluated as bio-based plasticizers for poly(vinylchloride). The rate of absorption of the bioplasticizers and their mixtures in the polymer was fast and, unlike that of petroleum-derived plasticizers, did not vary significantly with molecular weight. These bio-derived plasticizers and their mixtures were compatible with the polymer even at high loadings. The succinate was the most volatile and efficient plasticizer, but on heat aging of the polymer compositions, it also had the greatest deleterious effects. Diffusion coefficients and apparent activation energies of formulations containing bioplasticizer mixtures were controlled by the more volatile succinate. Mixtures comprising up to 50 wt% of the succinate yielded acceptably high-tensile properties after thermal aging as well as better plasticization efficiency than the epoxy bioplasticizer. Although the succinate resulted in inferior volume resistivity of the polymer compositions, improvements were obtained with increasing proportions of the epoxidized derivative in plasticizer mixtures. Melt state viscosity-shear rate curves of compositions containing dioctyl succinate (DOS) were similar to those made with two of the petroleum-derived plasticizers, but a DOS/ESO mixture yielded extended non-Newtonian behavior at low-shear rates. POLYM. ENG. SCI., 55:634-640, 2015.

AB - Mixtures of bis(2-ethylhexyl) succinate and epoxidized soybean oil (ESO) have been evaluated as bio-based plasticizers for poly(vinylchloride). The rate of absorption of the bioplasticizers and their mixtures in the polymer was fast and, unlike that of petroleum-derived plasticizers, did not vary significantly with molecular weight. These bio-derived plasticizers and their mixtures were compatible with the polymer even at high loadings. The succinate was the most volatile and efficient plasticizer, but on heat aging of the polymer compositions, it also had the greatest deleterious effects. Diffusion coefficients and apparent activation energies of formulations containing bioplasticizer mixtures were controlled by the more volatile succinate. Mixtures comprising up to 50 wt% of the succinate yielded acceptably high-tensile properties after thermal aging as well as better plasticization efficiency than the epoxy bioplasticizer. Although the succinate resulted in inferior volume resistivity of the polymer compositions, improvements were obtained with increasing proportions of the epoxidized derivative in plasticizer mixtures. Melt state viscosity-shear rate curves of compositions containing dioctyl succinate (DOS) were similar to those made with two of the petroleum-derived plasticizers, but a DOS/ESO mixture yielded extended non-Newtonian behavior at low-shear rates. POLYM. ENG. SCI., 55:634-640, 2015.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84923092313&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84923092313&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/pen.23934

DO - 10.1002/pen.23934

M3 - Article

VL - 55

SP - 634

EP - 640

JO - Polymer Engineering and Science

T2 - Polymer Engineering and Science

JF - Polymer Engineering and Science

SN - 0032-3888

IS - 3

ER -