Calcium-sensing receptor and transient receptor ankyrin-1 mediate emesis induction by deoxynivalenol (vomitoxin)

Wenda Wu, Hui Ren Zhou, Steven J. Bursian, Jane E. Link, James J. Pestka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • 3 Citations

Abstract

The common foodborne mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON, vomitoxin) can negatively impact animal and human health by causing food refusal and vomiting. Gut enteroendocrine cells (EECs) secrete hormones that mediate DON's anorectic and emetic effects. In prior work utilizing a cloned EEC model, our laboratory discovered that DON-induced activation of calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR), a G-coupled protein receptor (GPCR), and transient receptor ankyrin-1 (TRPA1), a transient receptor potential (TRP) channel, drives Ca2+-mediated hormone secretion. Consistent with these in vitro findings, CaSR and TRPA1 mediate DON-induced satiety hormone release and food refusal in the mouse, an animal model incapable of vomiting. However, the roles of this GPCR and TRP in DON's emetic effects remain to be determined. To address this, we tested the hypothesis that DON triggers emesis in mink by activating CaSR and TRPA1. Oral gavage with selective agonists for CaSR (R-568) or TRPA1 (allyl isothiocyanate; AITC) rapidly elicited emesis in the mink in dose-dependent fashion. Oral pretreatment of the animals with the CaSR antagonist NPS-2143 or the TRP antagonist ruthenium red (RR), respectively, inhibited these responses. Importantly, DON-induced emesis in mink was similarly inhibited by oral pretreatment with NPS-2143 or RR. In addition, these antagonists suppressed concurrent DON-induced elevations in plasma peptide YY3-36 and 5-hydroxytryptamine-hormones previously demonstrated to mediate the toxin's emetic effects in mink. Furthermore, antagonist co-treatment additively suppressed DON-induced emesis and peptide YY 3-36 release. To summarize, the observations here strongly suggest that activation of CaSR and TRPA1 might have critical roles in DON-induced emesis.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages32-42
Number of pages11
JournalToxicological Sciences
Volume155
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2017

Profile

Ankyrins
Calcium-Sensing Receptors
Vomiting
Mink
Emetics
Enteroendocrine Cells
Hormones
Peptide YY
Ruthenium Red
Animals
G-Protein-Coupled Receptors
N-(2-chlorophenylpropyl)-1-(3-methoxyphenyl)ethylamine
Chemical activation
Transient Receptor Potential Channels
Food
Appetite Depressants
Mycotoxins
deoxynivalenol
Serotonin
Animal Models

Keywords

  • 5-HT
  • Calcium-sensing receptor
  • Deoxynivalenol
  • Emesis
  • Mycotoxin
  • Peptide YY3- 36
  • PYY3-36
  • Serotonin
  • Transient receptor potential channel

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Toxicology

Cite this

Calcium-sensing receptor and transient receptor ankyrin-1 mediate emesis induction by deoxynivalenol (vomitoxin). / Wu, Wenda; Zhou, Hui Ren; Bursian, Steven J.; Link, Jane E.; Pestka, James J.

In: Toxicological Sciences, Vol. 155, No. 1, 2017, p. 32-42.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "The common foodborne mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON, vomitoxin) can negatively impact animal and human health by causing food refusal and vomiting. Gut enteroendocrine cells (EECs) secrete hormones that mediate DON's anorectic and emetic effects. In prior work utilizing a cloned EEC model, our laboratory discovered that DON-induced activation of calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR), a G-coupled protein receptor (GPCR), and transient receptor ankyrin-1 (TRPA1), a transient receptor potential (TRP) channel, drives Ca2+-mediated hormone secretion. Consistent with these in vitro findings, CaSR and TRPA1 mediate DON-induced satiety hormone release and food refusal in the mouse, an animal model incapable of vomiting. However, the roles of this GPCR and TRP in DON's emetic effects remain to be determined. To address this, we tested the hypothesis that DON triggers emesis in mink by activating CaSR and TRPA1. Oral gavage with selective agonists for CaSR (R-568) or TRPA1 (allyl isothiocyanate; AITC) rapidly elicited emesis in the mink in dose-dependent fashion. Oral pretreatment of the animals with the CaSR antagonist NPS-2143 or the TRP antagonist ruthenium red (RR), respectively, inhibited these responses. Importantly, DON-induced emesis in mink was similarly inhibited by oral pretreatment with NPS-2143 or RR. In addition, these antagonists suppressed concurrent DON-induced elevations in plasma peptide YY3-36 and 5-hydroxytryptamine-hormones previously demonstrated to mediate the toxin's emetic effects in mink. Furthermore, antagonist co-treatment additively suppressed DON-induced emesis and peptide YY 3-36 release. To summarize, the observations here strongly suggest that activation of CaSR and TRPA1 might have critical roles in DON-induced emesis.",
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AU - Link,Jane E.

AU - Pestka,James J.

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N2 - The common foodborne mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON, vomitoxin) can negatively impact animal and human health by causing food refusal and vomiting. Gut enteroendocrine cells (EECs) secrete hormones that mediate DON's anorectic and emetic effects. In prior work utilizing a cloned EEC model, our laboratory discovered that DON-induced activation of calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR), a G-coupled protein receptor (GPCR), and transient receptor ankyrin-1 (TRPA1), a transient receptor potential (TRP) channel, drives Ca2+-mediated hormone secretion. Consistent with these in vitro findings, CaSR and TRPA1 mediate DON-induced satiety hormone release and food refusal in the mouse, an animal model incapable of vomiting. However, the roles of this GPCR and TRP in DON's emetic effects remain to be determined. To address this, we tested the hypothesis that DON triggers emesis in mink by activating CaSR and TRPA1. Oral gavage with selective agonists for CaSR (R-568) or TRPA1 (allyl isothiocyanate; AITC) rapidly elicited emesis in the mink in dose-dependent fashion. Oral pretreatment of the animals with the CaSR antagonist NPS-2143 or the TRP antagonist ruthenium red (RR), respectively, inhibited these responses. Importantly, DON-induced emesis in mink was similarly inhibited by oral pretreatment with NPS-2143 or RR. In addition, these antagonists suppressed concurrent DON-induced elevations in plasma peptide YY3-36 and 5-hydroxytryptamine-hormones previously demonstrated to mediate the toxin's emetic effects in mink. Furthermore, antagonist co-treatment additively suppressed DON-induced emesis and peptide YY 3-36 release. To summarize, the observations here strongly suggest that activation of CaSR and TRPA1 might have critical roles in DON-induced emesis.

AB - The common foodborne mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON, vomitoxin) can negatively impact animal and human health by causing food refusal and vomiting. Gut enteroendocrine cells (EECs) secrete hormones that mediate DON's anorectic and emetic effects. In prior work utilizing a cloned EEC model, our laboratory discovered that DON-induced activation of calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR), a G-coupled protein receptor (GPCR), and transient receptor ankyrin-1 (TRPA1), a transient receptor potential (TRP) channel, drives Ca2+-mediated hormone secretion. Consistent with these in vitro findings, CaSR and TRPA1 mediate DON-induced satiety hormone release and food refusal in the mouse, an animal model incapable of vomiting. However, the roles of this GPCR and TRP in DON's emetic effects remain to be determined. To address this, we tested the hypothesis that DON triggers emesis in mink by activating CaSR and TRPA1. Oral gavage with selective agonists for CaSR (R-568) or TRPA1 (allyl isothiocyanate; AITC) rapidly elicited emesis in the mink in dose-dependent fashion. Oral pretreatment of the animals with the CaSR antagonist NPS-2143 or the TRP antagonist ruthenium red (RR), respectively, inhibited these responses. Importantly, DON-induced emesis in mink was similarly inhibited by oral pretreatment with NPS-2143 or RR. In addition, these antagonists suppressed concurrent DON-induced elevations in plasma peptide YY3-36 and 5-hydroxytryptamine-hormones previously demonstrated to mediate the toxin's emetic effects in mink. Furthermore, antagonist co-treatment additively suppressed DON-induced emesis and peptide YY 3-36 release. To summarize, the observations here strongly suggest that activation of CaSR and TRPA1 might have critical roles in DON-induced emesis.

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KW - Serotonin

KW - Transient receptor potential channel

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