Cell adhesion on polyelectrolyte multilayer coated polydimethylsiloxane surfaces with varying topographies

Srivatsan Kidambi, Natasha Udpa, Stacey A. Schroeder, Robert Findlan, Ilsoon Lee, Christina Chan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • 56 Citations

Abstract

This article demonstrates that the micro-topography of the surface with respect to the pattern size and pitch influences cell adhesion and proliferation. Extensive research has shown the dependence of cell proliferation on substrate chemistry, but the influence of substrate topography on cell attachment has only recently been appreciated. To evaluate the effect of substrate physical properties (i.e., periodic microstructures) on cell attachment and morphology, we compared the response of several cell types (fibroblasts, HeLa, and primary hepatocytes) cultured on various polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) patterns. PDMS has been used as an artificial construct to mimic biological structures. Although PDMS is widely used in biomedical applications, membrane technology, and microlithography, it is difficult to maintain cells on PDMS for long periods, and the polymer has proved to be a relatively inefficient substrate for cell adhesion. To improve adhesion, we built polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) on PDMS surfaces to increase surface wettability, thereby improving attachment and spreading of the cells. Micrographs demonstrate the cellular response to physical parameters, such as pattern size and pitch, and suggest that surface topography, in part, regulates cell adhesion and proliferation. Therefore, varying the surface topography may provide a method to influence cell attachment and proliferation for tissue-engineering applications.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages2105-2117
Number of pages13
JournalTissue Engineering
Volume13
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2007

Profile

Cell adhesion
Polydimethylsiloxane
Polyelectrolytes
Cell Adhesion
Topography
Multilayers
Cell proliferation
Cell Proliferation
Surface topography
Substrates
Wettability
Membrane technology
Fibroblasts
Tissue Engineering
HeLa Cells
Tissue engineering
Lithography
Wetting
Hepatocytes
Polymers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Cell Biology
  • Biotechnology

Cite this

Cell adhesion on polyelectrolyte multilayer coated polydimethylsiloxane surfaces with varying topographies. / Kidambi, Srivatsan; Udpa, Natasha; Schroeder, Stacey A.; Findlan, Robert; Lee, Ilsoon; Chan, Christina.

In: Tissue Engineering, Vol. 13, No. 8, 08.2007, p. 2105-2117.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kidambi, Srivatsan ; Udpa, Natasha ; Schroeder, Stacey A. ; Findlan, Robert ; Lee, Ilsoon ; Chan, Christina. / Cell adhesion on polyelectrolyte multilayer coated polydimethylsiloxane surfaces with varying topographies. In: Tissue Engineering. 2007 ; Vol. 13, No. 8. pp. 2105-2117
@article{d6ea974c2edd4e0a8ba00ad5d0b4e92d,
title = "Cell adhesion on polyelectrolyte multilayer coated polydimethylsiloxane surfaces with varying topographies",
abstract = "This article demonstrates that the micro-topography of the surface with respect to the pattern size and pitch influences cell adhesion and proliferation. Extensive research has shown the dependence of cell proliferation on substrate chemistry, but the influence of substrate topography on cell attachment has only recently been appreciated. To evaluate the effect of substrate physical properties (i.e., periodic microstructures) on cell attachment and morphology, we compared the response of several cell types (fibroblasts, HeLa, and primary hepatocytes) cultured on various polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) patterns. PDMS has been used as an artificial construct to mimic biological structures. Although PDMS is widely used in biomedical applications, membrane technology, and microlithography, it is difficult to maintain cells on PDMS for long periods, and the polymer has proved to be a relatively inefficient substrate for cell adhesion. To improve adhesion, we built polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) on PDMS surfaces to increase surface wettability, thereby improving attachment and spreading of the cells. Micrographs demonstrate the cellular response to physical parameters, such as pattern size and pitch, and suggest that surface topography, in part, regulates cell adhesion and proliferation. Therefore, varying the surface topography may provide a method to influence cell attachment and proliferation for tissue-engineering applications.",
author = "Srivatsan Kidambi and Natasha Udpa and Schroeder, {Stacey A.} and Robert Findlan and Ilsoon Lee and Christina Chan",
year = "2007",
month = "8",
doi = "10.1089/ten.2006.0151",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "13",
pages = "2105--2117",
journal = "Tissue Engineering",
issn = "1076-3279",
publisher = "Mary Ann Liebert Inc.",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cell adhesion on polyelectrolyte multilayer coated polydimethylsiloxane surfaces with varying topographies

AU - Kidambi,Srivatsan

AU - Udpa,Natasha

AU - Schroeder,Stacey A.

AU - Findlan,Robert

AU - Lee,Ilsoon

AU - Chan,Christina

PY - 2007/8

Y1 - 2007/8

N2 - This article demonstrates that the micro-topography of the surface with respect to the pattern size and pitch influences cell adhesion and proliferation. Extensive research has shown the dependence of cell proliferation on substrate chemistry, but the influence of substrate topography on cell attachment has only recently been appreciated. To evaluate the effect of substrate physical properties (i.e., periodic microstructures) on cell attachment and morphology, we compared the response of several cell types (fibroblasts, HeLa, and primary hepatocytes) cultured on various polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) patterns. PDMS has been used as an artificial construct to mimic biological structures. Although PDMS is widely used in biomedical applications, membrane technology, and microlithography, it is difficult to maintain cells on PDMS for long periods, and the polymer has proved to be a relatively inefficient substrate for cell adhesion. To improve adhesion, we built polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) on PDMS surfaces to increase surface wettability, thereby improving attachment and spreading of the cells. Micrographs demonstrate the cellular response to physical parameters, such as pattern size and pitch, and suggest that surface topography, in part, regulates cell adhesion and proliferation. Therefore, varying the surface topography may provide a method to influence cell attachment and proliferation for tissue-engineering applications.

AB - This article demonstrates that the micro-topography of the surface with respect to the pattern size and pitch influences cell adhesion and proliferation. Extensive research has shown the dependence of cell proliferation on substrate chemistry, but the influence of substrate topography on cell attachment has only recently been appreciated. To evaluate the effect of substrate physical properties (i.e., periodic microstructures) on cell attachment and morphology, we compared the response of several cell types (fibroblasts, HeLa, and primary hepatocytes) cultured on various polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) patterns. PDMS has been used as an artificial construct to mimic biological structures. Although PDMS is widely used in biomedical applications, membrane technology, and microlithography, it is difficult to maintain cells on PDMS for long periods, and the polymer has proved to be a relatively inefficient substrate for cell adhesion. To improve adhesion, we built polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) on PDMS surfaces to increase surface wettability, thereby improving attachment and spreading of the cells. Micrographs demonstrate the cellular response to physical parameters, such as pattern size and pitch, and suggest that surface topography, in part, regulates cell adhesion and proliferation. Therefore, varying the surface topography may provide a method to influence cell attachment and proliferation for tissue-engineering applications.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=34548089512&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=34548089512&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1089/ten.2006.0151

DO - 10.1089/ten.2006.0151

M3 - Article

VL - 13

SP - 2105

EP - 2117

JO - Tissue Engineering

T2 - Tissue Engineering

JF - Tissue Engineering

SN - 1076-3279

IS - 8

ER -