Cell adhesive behavior on thin polyelectrolyte multilayers: Cells attempt to achieve homeostasis of its adhesion energy

Sumit Mehrotra, S. Christopher Hunley, Kendell M. Pawelec, Linxia Zhang, Ilsoon Lee, Seungik Baek, Christina Chan

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    • 37 Citations

    Abstract

    Linearly growing ultrathin polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM) films of strong polyelectrolytes, poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDAC), and sulfonated polystyrene, sodium salt (SPS) exhibit a gradual shift from cytophilic to cytophobic behavior, with increasing thickness for films of less than 100 nm. Previous explanations based on film hydration, swelling, and changes in the elastic modulus cannot account for the cytophobicity observed with these thin films as the number of bilayers increases. We implemented a finite element analysis to help elucidate the observed trends in cell spreading. The simulation results suggest that cells maintain a constant level of energy consumption (energy homeostasis) during active probing and thus respond to changes in the film stiffness as the film thickness increases by adjusting their morphology and the number of focal adhesions recruited and thereby their attachment to a substrate.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)12794-12802
    Number of pages9
    JournalLangmuir
    Volume26
    Issue number15
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Aug 3 2010

    Profile

    cells
    Polyelectrolytes
    Magnesium Deficiency
    Arthroscopy
    Adhesives
    Homeostasis
    Adhesion
    Aldicarb
    homeostasis
    adhesion
    energy
    Finite Element Analysis
    Focal Adhesions
    Elastic Modulus
    Polystyrenes
    Chlorides
    Salts
    Sodium
    Multilayer films
    Hydration

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Electrochemistry
    • Condensed Matter Physics
    • Surfaces and Interfaces
    • Materials Science(all)
    • Spectroscopy
    • Medicine(all)

    Cite this

    Cell adhesive behavior on thin polyelectrolyte multilayers : Cells attempt to achieve homeostasis of its adhesion energy. / Mehrotra, Sumit; Hunley, S. Christopher; Pawelec, Kendell M.; Zhang, Linxia; Lee, Ilsoon; Baek, Seungik; Chan, Christina.

    In: Langmuir, Vol. 26, No. 15, 03.08.2010, p. 12794-12802.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Mehrotra S, Hunley SC, Pawelec KM, Zhang L, Lee I, Baek S et al. Cell adhesive behavior on thin polyelectrolyte multilayers: Cells attempt to achieve homeostasis of its adhesion energy. Langmuir. 2010 Aug 3;26(15):12794-12802. Available from, DOI: 10.1021/la101689z

    Mehrotra, Sumit; Hunley, S. Christopher; Pawelec, Kendell M.; Zhang, Linxia; Lee, Ilsoon; Baek, Seungik; Chan, Christina / Cell adhesive behavior on thin polyelectrolyte multilayers : Cells attempt to achieve homeostasis of its adhesion energy.

    In: Langmuir, Vol. 26, No. 15, 03.08.2010, p. 12794-12802.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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