Cloud point studies for diesel and jet fuel bio-derived fuels

Anne Lown, Lars Peereboom, Dennis J. Miller, Carl T. Lira

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Cloud point measurements are presented for additives in two test diesel blends and jet fuel. Additive functionalities studied include diesters, esters, ketones, ethers, and alkanes. Diesters, as a class, create liquid-liquid immiscibility and a cloud point higher than that of either the base fuel or the pure diester. Esters decrease the cloud point of diesels fuels, as do most ketones. Ethers and alkanes, respectively, decrease the cloud point even more. These results are consistent with the precipitation of a component of the petroleum fuel, rather than an additive, and the decrease in cloud point is due to a dilution effect. For some ketones, a different effect is observed. Based on the pure component melting temperature of the ketone, the compounds studied cause decreases or increases. Long chain ester components were also tested. These additives have higher cetane numbers than other potential fuel components, and are more desirable as a diesel fuel component. Ketones and ethers of similar lengths were also tested, and have the same behaviors as described above. The behavior of potential fuel additives seems to be more related to the oxygen containing functional group rather than extent of branching or size. Experimental results are interpreted with thermodynamic models using modified surrogates. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the 2012 AIChE Spring Meeting and 8th Global Congress on Process Safety (Houston, TX 4/1-5/2012).

LanguageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication12AIChE - 2012 AIChE Spring Meeting and 8th Global Congress on Process Safety, Conference Proceedings
StatePublished - 2012
Event2012 AIChE Spring Meeting and 8th Global Congress on Process Safety, 12AIChE - Houston, TX, United States
Duration: Apr 1 2012Apr 5 2012

Other

Other2012 AIChE Spring Meeting and 8th Global Congress on Process Safety, 12AIChE
CountryUnited States
CityHouston, TX
Period4/1/124/5/12

Profile

Jet fuel
Diesel fuels
Ketones
Ethers
Esters
Alkanes
Paraffins
Fuel additives
Antiknock rating
Petroleum
Liquids
Functional groups
Dilution
Melting point
Solubility
Crude oil
Thermodynamics
Oxygen

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Chemistry(all)
  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality

Cite this

Lown, A., Peereboom, L., Miller, D. J., & Lira, C. T. (2012). Cloud point studies for diesel and jet fuel bio-derived fuels. In 12AIChE - 2012 AIChE Spring Meeting and 8th Global Congress on Process Safety, Conference Proceedings

Cloud point studies for diesel and jet fuel bio-derived fuels. / Lown, Anne; Peereboom, Lars; Miller, Dennis J.; Lira, Carl T.

12AIChE - 2012 AIChE Spring Meeting and 8th Global Congress on Process Safety, Conference Proceedings. 2012.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Lown, A, Peereboom, L, Miller, DJ & Lira, CT 2012, Cloud point studies for diesel and jet fuel bio-derived fuels. in 12AIChE - 2012 AIChE Spring Meeting and 8th Global Congress on Process Safety, Conference Proceedings. 2012 AIChE Spring Meeting and 8th Global Congress on Process Safety, 12AIChE, Houston, TX, United States, 4/1/12.
Lown A, Peereboom L, Miller DJ, Lira CT. Cloud point studies for diesel and jet fuel bio-derived fuels. In 12AIChE - 2012 AIChE Spring Meeting and 8th Global Congress on Process Safety, Conference Proceedings. 2012.
Lown, Anne ; Peereboom, Lars ; Miller, Dennis J. ; Lira, Carl T./ Cloud point studies for diesel and jet fuel bio-derived fuels. 12AIChE - 2012 AIChE Spring Meeting and 8th Global Congress on Process Safety, Conference Proceedings. 2012.
@inproceedings{195a39a476c146a492e38b496d1faf62,
title = "Cloud point studies for diesel and jet fuel bio-derived fuels",
abstract = "Cloud point measurements are presented for additives in two test diesel blends and jet fuel. Additive functionalities studied include diesters, esters, ketones, ethers, and alkanes. Diesters, as a class, create liquid-liquid immiscibility and a cloud point higher than that of either the base fuel or the pure diester. Esters decrease the cloud point of diesels fuels, as do most ketones. Ethers and alkanes, respectively, decrease the cloud point even more. These results are consistent with the precipitation of a component of the petroleum fuel, rather than an additive, and the decrease in cloud point is due to a dilution effect. For some ketones, a different effect is observed. Based on the pure component melting temperature of the ketone, the compounds studied cause decreases or increases. Long chain ester components were also tested. These additives have higher cetane numbers than other potential fuel components, and are more desirable as a diesel fuel component. Ketones and ethers of similar lengths were also tested, and have the same behaviors as described above. The behavior of potential fuel additives seems to be more related to the oxygen containing functional group rather than extent of branching or size. Experimental results are interpreted with thermodynamic models using modified surrogates. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the 2012 AIChE Spring Meeting and 8th Global Congress on Process Safety (Houston, TX 4/1-5/2012).",
author = "Anne Lown and Lars Peereboom and Miller, {Dennis J.} and Lira, {Carl T.}",
year = "2012",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "9780816910717",
booktitle = "12AIChE - 2012 AIChE Spring Meeting and 8th Global Congress on Process Safety, Conference Proceedings",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - Cloud point studies for diesel and jet fuel bio-derived fuels

AU - Lown,Anne

AU - Peereboom,Lars

AU - Miller,Dennis J.

AU - Lira,Carl T.

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - Cloud point measurements are presented for additives in two test diesel blends and jet fuel. Additive functionalities studied include diesters, esters, ketones, ethers, and alkanes. Diesters, as a class, create liquid-liquid immiscibility and a cloud point higher than that of either the base fuel or the pure diester. Esters decrease the cloud point of diesels fuels, as do most ketones. Ethers and alkanes, respectively, decrease the cloud point even more. These results are consistent with the precipitation of a component of the petroleum fuel, rather than an additive, and the decrease in cloud point is due to a dilution effect. For some ketones, a different effect is observed. Based on the pure component melting temperature of the ketone, the compounds studied cause decreases or increases. Long chain ester components were also tested. These additives have higher cetane numbers than other potential fuel components, and are more desirable as a diesel fuel component. Ketones and ethers of similar lengths were also tested, and have the same behaviors as described above. The behavior of potential fuel additives seems to be more related to the oxygen containing functional group rather than extent of branching or size. Experimental results are interpreted with thermodynamic models using modified surrogates. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the 2012 AIChE Spring Meeting and 8th Global Congress on Process Safety (Houston, TX 4/1-5/2012).

AB - Cloud point measurements are presented for additives in two test diesel blends and jet fuel. Additive functionalities studied include diesters, esters, ketones, ethers, and alkanes. Diesters, as a class, create liquid-liquid immiscibility and a cloud point higher than that of either the base fuel or the pure diester. Esters decrease the cloud point of diesels fuels, as do most ketones. Ethers and alkanes, respectively, decrease the cloud point even more. These results are consistent with the precipitation of a component of the petroleum fuel, rather than an additive, and the decrease in cloud point is due to a dilution effect. For some ketones, a different effect is observed. Based on the pure component melting temperature of the ketone, the compounds studied cause decreases or increases. Long chain ester components were also tested. These additives have higher cetane numbers than other potential fuel components, and are more desirable as a diesel fuel component. Ketones and ethers of similar lengths were also tested, and have the same behaviors as described above. The behavior of potential fuel additives seems to be more related to the oxygen containing functional group rather than extent of branching or size. Experimental results are interpreted with thermodynamic models using modified surrogates. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the 2012 AIChE Spring Meeting and 8th Global Congress on Process Safety (Houston, TX 4/1-5/2012).

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84861420570&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84861420570&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Conference contribution

SN - 9780816910717

BT - 12AIChE - 2012 AIChE Spring Meeting and 8th Global Congress on Process Safety, Conference Proceedings

ER -