Comparative Performance of Leading Pretreatment Technologies for Biological Conversion of Corn Stover, Poplar Wood, and Switchgrass to Sugars

Charles E. Wyman, Bruce E. Dale, Venkatesh Balan, Richard T. Elander, Mark T. Holtzapple, Rocío Sierra Ramirez, Michael R. Ladisch, Nathan S. Mosier, Y. Y. Lee, Rajesh Gupta, Steven R. Thomas, Bonnie R. Hames, Ryan Warner, Rajeev Kumar

    Research output: ResearchChapter

    • 12 Citations

    Abstract

    The Biomass Refining Consortium for Applied Fundamentals and Innovation (CAFI), formed in early 2000, completed its last study in 2010 to determine comparative sugar yields from application of leading pretreatments to shared sources of cellulosic feedstocks followed by enzymatic hydrolysis of the resulting solids with a common source of enzymes. This chapter highlights key findings over the 10-year life of the CAFI team on the enzymatic hydrolysis of corn stover, poplar wood, and switchgrass that had been subjected to the following leading pretreatments: ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX), ammonia recycle percolation (ARP), dilute sulfuric acid, liquid hot water (LHW), lime, soaking in aqueous ammonia (SAA), and sulfur dioxide steam explosion. First, compositions are reported for each of the three baseline CAFI feedstocks. For all three feedstocks, the highest yields of xylose, glucose, and soluble oligomers are then reported for pretreatment coupled with subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis with baseline loadings of cellulase and β-glucosidase. In all cases, material balances were performed. Differences in yields are then reported for application of the same pretreatments to a second source of poplar and two other varieties of switchgrass. Following pretreatment of each feedstock, the compositions of the solids are compared to demonstrate that high yields can be realized even though the different pretreatments left different proportions of xylan and lignin in the pretreated solids. Temperatures, times, and catalyst types and loadings that resulted in the highest xylose and glucose yields in solution are summarized for each feedstock and pretreatment. The results show that a wide range of pretreatment conditions can realize high yields of sugars from cellulosic biomass, and that different types of biomass and even different varieties of the same biomass perform differently and can require modification of pretreatment conditions to increase yields.

    LanguageEnglish (US)
    Title of host publicationAqueous Pretreatment of Plant Biomass for Biological and Chemical Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals
    PublisherJohn Wiley and Sons
    Pages239-259
    Number of pages21
    ISBN (Print)9780470972021
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Apr 5 2013

    Profile

    sugar
    maize
    biomass
    hydrolysis
    innovation
    ammonia
    glucose
    sulfur dioxide
    sulfuric acid
    lignin
    lime
    explosion
    catalyst
    enzyme
    liquid
    temperature
    material
    fibre
    soaking
    refining

    Keywords

    • Ammonia pretreatment
    • Cellulosic biomass
    • Dilute acid pretreatment
    • Enzymatic hydrolysis
    • Hot water pretreatment
    • Hydrothermal pretreatment
    • Lime pretreatment
    • Neutral pH pretreatment
    • Pretreatment
    • Sulfur dioxide pretreatment

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Environmental Science(all)

    Cite this

    Wyman, C. E., Dale, B. E., Balan, V., Elander, R. T., Holtzapple, M. T., Ramirez, R. S., ... Kumar, R. (2013). Comparative Performance of Leading Pretreatment Technologies for Biological Conversion of Corn Stover, Poplar Wood, and Switchgrass to Sugars. In Aqueous Pretreatment of Plant Biomass for Biological and Chemical Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals (pp. 239-259). John Wiley and Sons. DOI: 10.1002/9780470975831.ch12

    Comparative Performance of Leading Pretreatment Technologies for Biological Conversion of Corn Stover, Poplar Wood, and Switchgrass to Sugars. / Wyman, Charles E.; Dale, Bruce E.; Balan, Venkatesh; Elander, Richard T.; Holtzapple, Mark T.; Ramirez, Rocío Sierra; Ladisch, Michael R.; Mosier, Nathan S.; Lee, Y. Y.; Gupta, Rajesh; Thomas, Steven R.; Hames, Bonnie R.; Warner, Ryan; Kumar, Rajeev.

    Aqueous Pretreatment of Plant Biomass for Biological and Chemical Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals. John Wiley and Sons, 2013. p. 239-259.

    Research output: ResearchChapter

    Wyman, CE, Dale, BE, Balan, V, Elander, RT, Holtzapple, MT, Ramirez, RS, Ladisch, MR, Mosier, NS, Lee, YY, Gupta, R, Thomas, SR, Hames, BR, Warner, R & Kumar, R 2013, Comparative Performance of Leading Pretreatment Technologies for Biological Conversion of Corn Stover, Poplar Wood, and Switchgrass to Sugars. in Aqueous Pretreatment of Plant Biomass for Biological and Chemical Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals. John Wiley and Sons, pp. 239-259. DOI: 10.1002/9780470975831.ch12
    Wyman CE, Dale BE, Balan V, Elander RT, Holtzapple MT, Ramirez RS et al. Comparative Performance of Leading Pretreatment Technologies for Biological Conversion of Corn Stover, Poplar Wood, and Switchgrass to Sugars. In Aqueous Pretreatment of Plant Biomass for Biological and Chemical Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals. John Wiley and Sons. 2013. p. 239-259. Available from, DOI: 10.1002/9780470975831.ch12
    Wyman, Charles E. ; Dale, Bruce E. ; Balan, Venkatesh ; Elander, Richard T. ; Holtzapple, Mark T. ; Ramirez, Rocío Sierra ; Ladisch, Michael R. ; Mosier, Nathan S. ; Lee, Y. Y. ; Gupta, Rajesh ; Thomas, Steven R. ; Hames, Bonnie R. ; Warner, Ryan ; Kumar, Rajeev. / Comparative Performance of Leading Pretreatment Technologies for Biological Conversion of Corn Stover, Poplar Wood, and Switchgrass to Sugars. Aqueous Pretreatment of Plant Biomass for Biological and Chemical Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals. John Wiley and Sons, 2013. pp. 239-259
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