Comparison of the deformation behaviour of commercially pure titanium and Ti-5Al-2.5Sn(wt.%) at 296 and 728 K

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    Abstract

    The tension and tensile-creep deformation behaviours of a fully-α phase commercially pure (CP) Ti and a near-α Ti-5Al-2.5Sn(wt.%) alloy deformed in situ inside a scanning electron microscope were compared. Tensile tests were performed at 296 and 728 K, while tensile-creep tests were performed at 728 K. The yield stress of CP Ti decreased dramatically with increasing temperature. In contrast, temperature had much smaller effect on the yield stress of Ti-5Al-2.5Sn(wt.%). Electron backscattered diffraction was performed both before and after the deformation, and slip trace analysis was used to determine the active slip and twinning systems, as well as the associated global stress state Schmid factors. In tension tests of CP Ti, prismatic slip was the most likely slip system to be activated when the Schmid factor exceeded 0.4. Prismatic slip was observed over the largest Schmid factor range, indicating that the local stress tensor varies significantly from the global stress state of uniaxial tension. The basal slip activity in Ti-5Al-2.5Sn(wt.%) was observed in a larger faction of grains than in CP Ti. Pyramidal c + a slip was more prevalent in CP Ti. Although twinning was an active deformation mode in tension tests of the CP Ti, it was rare in Ti-5Al-2.5Sn(wt.%). During creep, dislocation slip was the primary apparent deformation mechanism in CP Ti, while evidence for dislocation slip was much less apparent in Ti-5Al-2.5Sn(wt.%), where grain boundary sliding was dominant. A robust statistical analysis was carried out to assess the significance of the comparative activity of the different slip systems under the variety of experimental conditions examined.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)2875-2895
    Number of pages21
    JournalPhilosophical Magazine
    Volume93
    Issue number21
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jul 1 2013

    Profile

    slip
    tensile creep
    twinning
    temperature
    creep tests
    stress tensors
    tensile tests
    statistical analysis
    sliding
    electron diffraction
    grain boundaries
    titanium
    electron microscopes
    scanning

    Keywords

    • creep
    • deformation behaviour
    • Schmid factor
    • tension
    • titanium

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Condensed Matter Physics

    Cite this

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    title = "Comparison of the deformation behaviour of commercially pure titanium and Ti-5Al-2.5Sn(wt.%) at 296 and 728 K",
    abstract = "The tension and tensile-creep deformation behaviours of a fully-α phase commercially pure (CP) Ti and a near-α Ti-5Al-2.5Sn(wt.%) alloy deformed in situ inside a scanning electron microscope were compared. Tensile tests were performed at 296 and 728 K, while tensile-creep tests were performed at 728 K. The yield stress of CP Ti decreased dramatically with increasing temperature. In contrast, temperature had much smaller effect on the yield stress of Ti-5Al-2.5Sn(wt.%). Electron backscattered diffraction was performed both before and after the deformation, and slip trace analysis was used to determine the active slip and twinning systems, as well as the associated global stress state Schmid factors. In tension tests of CP Ti, prismatic slip was the most likely slip system to be activated when the Schmid factor exceeded 0.4. Prismatic slip was observed over the largest Schmid factor range, indicating that the local stress tensor varies significantly from the global stress state of uniaxial tension. The basal slip activity in Ti-5Al-2.5Sn(wt.%) was observed in a larger faction of grains than in CP Ti. Pyramidal c + a slip was more prevalent in CP Ti. Although twinning was an active deformation mode in tension tests of the CP Ti, it was rare in Ti-5Al-2.5Sn(wt.%). During creep, dislocation slip was the primary apparent deformation mechanism in CP Ti, while evidence for dislocation slip was much less apparent in Ti-5Al-2.5Sn(wt.%), where grain boundary sliding was dominant. A robust statistical analysis was carried out to assess the significance of the comparative activity of the different slip systems under the variety of experimental conditions examined.",
    keywords = "creep, deformation behaviour, Schmid factor, tension, titanium",
    author = "H. Li and Mason, {D. E.} and Y. Yang and Bieler, {T. R.} and Crimp, {M. A.} and Boehlert, {C. J.}",
    year = "2013",
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    T1 - Comparison of the deformation behaviour of commercially pure titanium and Ti-5Al-2.5Sn(wt.%) at 296 and 728 K

    AU - Li,H.

    AU - Mason,D. E.

    AU - Yang,Y.

    AU - Bieler,T. R.

    AU - Crimp,M. A.

    AU - Boehlert,C. J.

    PY - 2013/7/1

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    N2 - The tension and tensile-creep deformation behaviours of a fully-α phase commercially pure (CP) Ti and a near-α Ti-5Al-2.5Sn(wt.%) alloy deformed in situ inside a scanning electron microscope were compared. Tensile tests were performed at 296 and 728 K, while tensile-creep tests were performed at 728 K. The yield stress of CP Ti decreased dramatically with increasing temperature. In contrast, temperature had much smaller effect on the yield stress of Ti-5Al-2.5Sn(wt.%). Electron backscattered diffraction was performed both before and after the deformation, and slip trace analysis was used to determine the active slip and twinning systems, as well as the associated global stress state Schmid factors. In tension tests of CP Ti, prismatic slip was the most likely slip system to be activated when the Schmid factor exceeded 0.4. Prismatic slip was observed over the largest Schmid factor range, indicating that the local stress tensor varies significantly from the global stress state of uniaxial tension. The basal slip activity in Ti-5Al-2.5Sn(wt.%) was observed in a larger faction of grains than in CP Ti. Pyramidal c + a slip was more prevalent in CP Ti. Although twinning was an active deformation mode in tension tests of the CP Ti, it was rare in Ti-5Al-2.5Sn(wt.%). During creep, dislocation slip was the primary apparent deformation mechanism in CP Ti, while evidence for dislocation slip was much less apparent in Ti-5Al-2.5Sn(wt.%), where grain boundary sliding was dominant. A robust statistical analysis was carried out to assess the significance of the comparative activity of the different slip systems under the variety of experimental conditions examined.

    AB - The tension and tensile-creep deformation behaviours of a fully-α phase commercially pure (CP) Ti and a near-α Ti-5Al-2.5Sn(wt.%) alloy deformed in situ inside a scanning electron microscope were compared. Tensile tests were performed at 296 and 728 K, while tensile-creep tests were performed at 728 K. The yield stress of CP Ti decreased dramatically with increasing temperature. In contrast, temperature had much smaller effect on the yield stress of Ti-5Al-2.5Sn(wt.%). Electron backscattered diffraction was performed both before and after the deformation, and slip trace analysis was used to determine the active slip and twinning systems, as well as the associated global stress state Schmid factors. In tension tests of CP Ti, prismatic slip was the most likely slip system to be activated when the Schmid factor exceeded 0.4. Prismatic slip was observed over the largest Schmid factor range, indicating that the local stress tensor varies significantly from the global stress state of uniaxial tension. The basal slip activity in Ti-5Al-2.5Sn(wt.%) was observed in a larger faction of grains than in CP Ti. Pyramidal c + a slip was more prevalent in CP Ti. Although twinning was an active deformation mode in tension tests of the CP Ti, it was rare in Ti-5Al-2.5Sn(wt.%). During creep, dislocation slip was the primary apparent deformation mechanism in CP Ti, while evidence for dislocation slip was much less apparent in Ti-5Al-2.5Sn(wt.%), where grain boundary sliding was dominant. A robust statistical analysis was carried out to assess the significance of the comparative activity of the different slip systems under the variety of experimental conditions examined.

    KW - creep

    KW - deformation behaviour

    KW - Schmid factor

    KW - tension

    KW - titanium

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    JO - Philosophical Magazine

    T2 - Philosophical Magazine

    JF - Philosophical Magazine

    SN - 1478-6435

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