Conductivity of an atomically defined metallic interface

David J. Oliver, Jesse Maassen, Mehdi El Ouali, William Paul, Till Hagedorn, Yoichi Miyahara, Yue Qi, Hong Guo, Peter Grütter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • 12 Citations

Abstract

A mechanically formed electrical nanocontact between gold and tungsten is a prototypical junction between metals with dissimilar electronic structure. Through atomically characterized nanoindentation experiments and first-principles quantum transport calculations, we find that the ballistic conduction across this intermetallic interface is drastically reduced because of the fundamental mismatch between swave-like modes of electron conduction in the gold and d wave-like modes in the tungsten. The mechanical formation of the junction introduces defects and disorder, which act as an additional source of conduction losses and increase junction resistance by up to an order of magnitude. These findings apply to nanoelectronics and semiconductor device design. The technique that we use is very broadly applicable to molecular electronics, nanoscale contact mechanics, and scanning tunneling microscopy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)19097-19102
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume109
Issue number47
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 20 2012
Externally publishedYes

Profile

Tungsten
Gold
Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy
Equipment Design
Semiconductors
Metals
Electrons

Keywords

  • Atomic force microscopy
  • Surface science

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Oliver, D. J., Maassen, J., El Ouali, M., Paul, W., Hagedorn, T., Miyahara, Y., ... Grütter, P. (2012). Conductivity of an atomically defined metallic interface. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 109(47), 19097-19102. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1208699109

Conductivity of an atomically defined metallic interface. / Oliver, David J.; Maassen, Jesse; El Ouali, Mehdi; Paul, William; Hagedorn, Till; Miyahara, Yoichi; Qi, Yue; Guo, Hong; Grütter, Peter.

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 109, No. 47, 20.11.2012, p. 19097-19102.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Oliver, DJ, Maassen, J, El Ouali, M, Paul, W, Hagedorn, T, Miyahara, Y, Qi, Y, Guo, H & Grütter, P 2012, 'Conductivity of an atomically defined metallic interface' Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol 109, no. 47, pp. 19097-19102. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1208699109
Oliver DJ, Maassen J, El Ouali M, Paul W, Hagedorn T, Miyahara Y et al. Conductivity of an atomically defined metallic interface. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 2012 Nov 20;109(47):19097-19102. Available from, DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1208699109

Oliver, David J.; Maassen, Jesse; El Ouali, Mehdi; Paul, William; Hagedorn, Till; Miyahara, Yoichi; Qi, Yue; Guo, Hong; Grütter, Peter / Conductivity of an atomically defined metallic interface.

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 109, No. 47, 20.11.2012, p. 19097-19102.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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