Convective mass transfer in large porous biocatalysts. Plant organ cultures

C. L. Prince, V. Bringi, M. L. Shuler

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

  • 34 Citations

Abstract

The importance of convective contributions to the total rate of mass transfer into porous biological catalysts has been insufficiently appreciated. For liquid systems, diffusion within large particles is generally slow relative to reaction, especially for sparingly soluble nutrients such as oxygen. We report experimental evidence demonstrating that oxygen consumption within porous root culture clumps is normally restricted by the rate of convective mass transfer within the clump. Increasing liquid flow rates around spheres of entangled rootlets induces higher rates of internal convective mass transfer and gives rise to increased total rates of oxygen consumption. Minimum external velocities for full nutrient sufficiency on the interior are not predicted well by creeping external flow models and, especially for larger biocatalysts, inertial effects must be taken into account. For higher Reynolds number external flow, form drag may be used to suggest the dependence of internal convection on external flow conditions. The minimum external liquid velocity for nutrient sufficiency is then seen to be a strong and unpredictable function of catalyst size and catalyst density. Implications for organ culture reactor design are discussed.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages195-199
Number of pages5
JournalBiotechnology Progress
Volume7
Issue number2
StatePublished - Mar 1991
Externally publishedYes

Profile

organ culture
plant organs
mass transfer
biocatalysts
Organ Culture Techniques
Food
Enzymes
catalysts
liquids
nutrients
Oxygen Consumption
oxygen consumption
Convection
Oxygen
oxygen
Reynolds number
convection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Biotechnology
  • Microbiology

Cite this

Convective mass transfer in large porous biocatalysts. Plant organ cultures. / Prince, C. L.; Bringi, V.; Shuler, M. L.

In: Biotechnology Progress, Vol. 7, No. 2, 03.1991, p. 195-199.

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

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