Convertible manganese contrast for molecular and cellular MRI

Erik M. Shapiro, Alan P. Koretsky

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

  • 43 Citations

Abstract

We describe here the use of inorganic manganese based particles as convertible MRI agents. As has been demonstrated with iron oxide particles, manganese oxide and manganese carbonate particles can be internalized within phagocytotic cells, being subsequently shuttled to endosomes and/or lysosomes. As intact particles, only susceptibility-induced MRI contrast is exhibited, most often seen as dark contrast in susceptibility-weighted images. Modulation of MRI contrast is accomplished by the selective degradation of these particles within the endosomal and lysosomal compartments of cells. Upon particle deconstruction in the endosomes and lysosomes, the dissolved Mn2+ acts as a T1 agent, eliciting bright contrast in T 1-weighted images. This modulation of MRI contrast is demonstrated both in vitro in cells in culture, and also in vivo, in rat brain. These particles are the potential building blocks for an entire class of new environmentally responsive MRI contrast agents.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages265-269
Number of pages5
JournalMagnetic Resonance in Medicine
Volume60
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2008
Externally publishedYes

Profile

Endosomes
Manganese
Lysosomes
Contrast Media
Cell Culture Techniques
Brain
manganese oxide
ferric oxide
manganese carbonate
In Vitro Techniques

Keywords

  • Brain
  • Cells
  • Contrast agents
  • Manganese
  • MRI

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Convertible manganese contrast for molecular and cellular MRI. / Shapiro, Erik M.; Koretsky, Alan P.

In: Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, Vol. 60, No. 2, 08.2008, p. 265-269.

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

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