DAMASK: The Düsseldorf Advanced MAterial Simulation Kit for studying crystal plasticity using an FE based or a spectral numerical solver

F. Roters, P. Eisenlohr, C. Kords, D. D. Tjahjanto, M. Diehl, D. Raabe

Research output: ResearchConference contribution

  • 45 Citations

Abstract

The solution of a continuum mechanical boundary value problem requires a constitutive response that connects deformation and stress at each material point. Such connection can be regarded as three separate hierarchical problems. At the top-most level, partitioning of the (mean) boundary values of the material point among its microstructural constituents and the associated homogenization of their response is required, provided there is more than one constituent present. Second, based on an elastoplastic decomposition of (finite strain) deformation, these responses follow from explicit or implicit time integration of the plastic deformation rate per constituent. Third, to establish the latter, a state variable-based constitutive law needs to be interrogated and its state updated. The Düsseldorf Advanced MAterial Simulation Kit (DAMASK) reflects this hierarchy as it is built in a strictly modular way. This modular structure makes it easy to add additional constitutive models as well as homogenization schemes. Moreover, it interfaces with a number of FE solvers as well as a spectral solver using an FFT. We demonstrate the versatility of such a modular framework by considering three scenarios: Selective refinement of the constitutive material description within a single geometry, component-scale forming simulations comparing different homogenization schemes, and comparison of representative volume element simulations based on the FEM and the spectral solver.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProcedia IUTAM
Pages3-10
Number of pages8
Volume3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012
Externally publishedYes
EventSymposium on International Union of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, IUTAM 2011 - Pensacola, FL, United States
Duration: May 17 2011May 19 2011

Other

OtherSymposium on International Union of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, IUTAM 2011
CountryUnited States
CityPensacola, FL
Period5/17/115/19/11

Profile

Plasticity
Crystals
Constitutive models
Fast Fourier transforms
Boundary value problems
Plastic deformation
Decomposition
Finite element method
Geometry

Keywords

  • Constitutive model
  • CPFEM
  • FFT
  • Spectral method

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

DAMASK : The Düsseldorf Advanced MAterial Simulation Kit for studying crystal plasticity using an FE based or a spectral numerical solver. / Roters, F.; Eisenlohr, P.; Kords, C.; Tjahjanto, D. D.; Diehl, M.; Raabe, D.

Procedia IUTAM. Vol. 3 2012. p. 3-10.

Research output: ResearchConference contribution

Roters, F, Eisenlohr, P, Kords, C, Tjahjanto, DD, Diehl, M & Raabe, D 2012, DAMASK: The Düsseldorf Advanced MAterial Simulation Kit for studying crystal plasticity using an FE based or a spectral numerical solver. in Procedia IUTAM. vol. 3, pp. 3-10, Symposium on International Union of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, IUTAM 2011, Pensacola, FL, United States, 5/17/11. DOI: 10.1016/j.piutam.2012.03.001
Roters, F. ; Eisenlohr, P. ; Kords, C. ; Tjahjanto, D. D. ; Diehl, M. ; Raabe, D./ DAMASK : The Düsseldorf Advanced MAterial Simulation Kit for studying crystal plasticity using an FE based or a spectral numerical solver. Procedia IUTAM. Vol. 3 2012. pp. 3-10
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