Development of sandwich composites for building construction with locally available materials

Faris Matalkah, Harsha Bharadwaj, Parviz Soroushian, Wenda Wu, Areej Almalkawi, Anagi M. Balachandra, Amirpasha Peyvandi

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

Abstract

A sandwich composite comprising ferrocement skins was developed as the primary structural module for building construction with indigenous materials. The indigenous reinforcement systems selected for use in ferrocement skins were jute burlap and chicken mesh (flexible galvanized steel wire). These reinforcement systems were characterized through performance of tension tests. The tensile strength, stiffness and ductility of jute burlaps were found to compare favorably with those of chicken mesh which is a viable reinforcement for use in ferrocement. Tension tests on ferrocement sheets indicated that indigenous reinforcement ratios above a threshold level could induce multiple cracking and strain-hardening behavior, producing a desired balance of tensile strength and ductility. The tensile strength of indigenous ferrocements with jute burlap reinforcement exceeded the theoretically predicted values, which could be attributed to the favorable interactions of the burlap reinforcement with the inorganic matrix, and the strengthening effects of hydrates precipitating within the yarn voids in burlap. Experiments were conducted to determine the bond strength and the required development length of the indigenous reinforcement in cementitious matrix. Indigenous sandwich composites comprising ferrocement skins with jute burlap reinforcement and an aerated concrete core made of lime-gypsum matrix and saponin foaming agent were fabricated and subjected to flexure testing. The sandwich composite provided relatively high flexural strengths; the flexural failure modes indicated that the relatively dense aerated concrete core makes important contributions to the flexural performance of the sandwich composite.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages380-387
Number of pages8
JournalConstruction and Building Materials
Volume147
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 30 2017
Externally publishedYes

Profile

Reinforcement
Composite materials
Reinforced concrete
Jute fibers
Skin
Tensile strength
Ductility
Concretes
Calcium Sulfate
Blowing agents
Steel
Saponins
Hydrates
Strain hardening
Bending strength
Failure modes
Yarn
Stiffness
Wire
Testing

Keywords

  • Building construction
  • Indigenous materials
  • Sandwich composites
  • Structural performance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Building and Construction
  • Materials Science(all)

Cite this

Matalkah, F., Bharadwaj, H., Soroushian, P., Wu, W., Almalkawi, A., Balachandra, A. M., & Peyvandi, A. (2017). Development of sandwich composites for building construction with locally available materials. Construction and Building Materials, 147, 380-387. DOI: 10.1016/j.conbuildmat.2017.04.113

Development of sandwich composites for building construction with locally available materials. / Matalkah, Faris; Bharadwaj, Harsha; Soroushian, Parviz; Wu, Wenda; Almalkawi, Areej; Balachandra, Anagi M.; Peyvandi, Amirpasha.

In: Construction and Building Materials, Vol. 147, 30.08.2017, p. 380-387.

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

Matalkah, Faris ; Bharadwaj, Harsha ; Soroushian, Parviz ; Wu, Wenda ; Almalkawi, Areej ; Balachandra, Anagi M. ; Peyvandi, Amirpasha. / Development of sandwich composites for building construction with locally available materials. In: Construction and Building Materials. 2017 ; Vol. 147. pp. 380-387
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