Direct transfer of preformed patterned bio-nanocomposite films on polyelectrolyte multilayer templates

    Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

    • 11 Citations

    Abstract

    Microarrays containing multiple, nanostructured layers of biological materials would enable high-throughput screening of drug candidates, investigation of protein-mediated cell adhesion, and fabrication of novel biosensors. In this paper, we have examined in detail an approach that allows high-quality microarrays of layered, bionanocomposite films to be deposited on virtually any substrate. The approach uses LBL self-assembly to pre-establish a multi-layered structure on an elastomeric stamp, and then uses μCP to transfer the 3-D structure intact to the target surface. For examples, different 3-D patterns containing dendrimers, polyelectrolyte multilayers and two proteins, sADH and sDH, have been fabricated. For the first time, the approach was also extended to create overlaid bionanocomposite patterns and multiple proteins containing patterns. The approach overcomes a problem encountered when using μCP to establish a pattern on the target surface and then building sequential layers on the pattern via LBL self-assembly. Amphiphilic molecules such as proteins and dendrimers tend to adsorb both to the patterned features as well as the underlying substrate, resulting in low-quality patterns. By circumventing this problem, this research significantly extends the range of surfaces and layering constituents that can be used to fabricate 3-D, patterned, bionanocomposite structures.

    LanguageEnglish (US)
    Pages789-797
    Number of pages9
    JournalMacromolecular Bioscience
    Volume7
    Issue number6
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jun 7 2007

    Profile

    Nanocomposite films
    Polyelectrolytes
    Multilayers
    Proteins
    Nanocomposites
    Dendrimers
    Microarrays
    Self assembly
    Substrates
    Cell adhesion
    Biosensors
    Biological materials
    Screening
    Throughput
    Fabrication
    Molecules
    Pharmaceutical Preparations
    elastomeric
    Preclinical Drug Evaluations
    Biosensing Techniques

    Keywords

    • Atomic force microscopy (AFM)
    • Bionanocomposite array
    • Dendrimers
    • Fluorescence microscopy
    • Intact transfer printing
    • ITP
    • Micro-contact printing
    • Microarrays
    • Multilayers
    • Polyelectrolytes
    • Proteins
    • Self-assembly

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
    • Biochemistry
    • Biomaterials
    • Polymers and Plastics
    • Materials Chemistry
    • Bioengineering

    Cite this

    Direct transfer of preformed patterned bio-nanocomposite films on polyelectrolyte multilayer templates. / Kohli, Neeraj; Worden, Robert M.; Lee, Ilsoon.

    In: Macromolecular Bioscience, Vol. 7, No. 6, 07.06.2007, p. 789-797.

    Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

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