Distinguishing patients with Parkinson's disease subtypes from normal controls based on functional network regional efficiencies

Delong Zhang, Xian Liu, Jun Chen, Bo Liu, Christina Chan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • 9 Citations

Abstract

Many studies have demonstrated that the pathophysiology and clinical symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) are inhomogeneous. However, the symptom-specific intrinsic neural activities underlying the PD subtypes are still not well understood. Here, 15 tremor-dominant PD patients, 10 non-tremor-dominant PD patients, and 20 matched normal controls (NCs) were recruited and underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Functional brain networks were constructed based on randomly generated anatomical templates with and without the cerebellum. The regional network efficiencies (i.e., the local and global efficiencies) were further measured and used to distinguish subgroups of PD patients (i.e., with tremor-dominant PD and non-tremor-dominant PD) from the NCs using linear discriminant analysis. The results demonstrate that the subtypespecific functional networks were small-world-organized and that the network regional efficiency could discriminate among the individual PD subgroups and the NCs. Brain regions involved in distinguishing between the study groups included the basal ganglia (i.e., the caudate and putamen), limbic regions (i.e., the hippocampus and thalamus), the cerebellum, and other cerebral regions (e.g., the insula, cingulum, and calcarine sulcus). In particular, the performances of the regional local efficiency in the functional network were better than those of the global efficiency, and the performances of global efficiency were dependent on the inclusion of the cerebellum in the analysis. These findings provide new evidence for the neurological basis of differences between PD subtypes and suggest that the cerebellum may play different roles in the pathologies of different PD subtypes. The present study demonstrated the power of the combination of graph-based network analysis and discrimination analysis in elucidating the neural basis of different PD subtypes.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Article numbere115131
JournalPLoS One
Volume9
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 22 2014

Profile

Parkinson disease
Parkinson Disease
cerebellum
Cerebellum
Tremor
signs and symptoms (animals and humans)
Brain
Occipital Lobe
Small-world networks
brain
Putamen
thalamus
Discriminant Analysis
Basal Ganglia
Thalamus
Discriminant analysis
Pathology
hippocampus
Electric network analysis
pathophysiology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Distinguishing patients with Parkinson's disease subtypes from normal controls based on functional network regional efficiencies. / Zhang, Delong; Liu, Xian; Chen, Jun; Liu, Bo; Chan, Christina.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 9, No. 12, e115131, 22.12.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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