Effects of nitrogen fertilizer on the ethanol fuel system

    Research output: ResearchConference contribution

    Abstract

    Ethanol is used as a substitute transportation fuel for gasoline in two ways: E10 (a mixture of 10 vol % ethanol and 90 vol % gasoline) and E85 (a mixture of 85 vol % ethanol and 15 vol % gasoline). Using ethanol derived from corn grain as liquid fuel would reduce nonrenewable energy and greenhouse gas emissions, but would increase acidification, eutrophication and photochemical smog, compared to using gasoline as liquid fuel, if current practices remain unchanged (primarily agricultural practices). The effects of nitrogen fertilizer application on the bioethanol fuel system were studied. To estimate local soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics in biomass cultivation, the DAYCENT model was used, which is the daily time step version of the CENTURY model, a multicompartmental ecosystem model. The system boundary includes corn production, transportation of corn to a dry mill, the dry mill processing steps, transportation of ethanol to users, ethanol fueled vehicle operation, and upstream processes. The effects of planting winter cover crops on the bioethanol fuel system were examined. The potential impact categories considered were nonrenewable energy consumption, greenhouse gas emissions, photochemical smog, acidification, and eutrophication. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the AIChE Annual Meeting (Salt Lake, UT 11/4-9/2007).

    LanguageEnglish (US)
    Title of host publication2007 AIChE Annual Meeting
    StatePublished - 2007
    Event2007 AIChE Annual Meeting - Salt Lake City, UT, United States
    Duration: Nov 4 2007Nov 9 2007

    Other

    Other2007 AIChE Annual Meeting
    CountryUnited States
    CitySalt Lake City, UT
    Period11/4/0711/9/07

    Profile

    Nitrogen fertilizers
    Ethanol fuels
    Fuel systems
    Ethanol
    Fertilizers
    Nitrogen
    Gasoline
    Zea mays
    Bioethanol
    Eutrophication
    Acidification
    Liquid fuels
    Gas emissions
    Greenhouse gases
    Smog
    Gases
    Ecosystems
    Crops
    Lakes
    Biomass

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Biotechnology
    • Chemical Engineering(all)
    • Bioengineering
    • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality

    Cite this

    Effects of nitrogen fertilizer on the ethanol fuel system. / Kim, Seungdo; Dale, Bruce.

    2007 AIChE Annual Meeting. 2007.

    Research output: ResearchConference contribution

    Kim, S & Dale, B 2007, Effects of nitrogen fertilizer on the ethanol fuel system. in 2007 AIChE Annual Meeting. 2007 AIChE Annual Meeting, Salt Lake City, UT, United States, 11/4/07.
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    abstract = "Ethanol is used as a substitute transportation fuel for gasoline in two ways: E10 (a mixture of 10 vol % ethanol and 90 vol % gasoline) and E85 (a mixture of 85 vol % ethanol and 15 vol % gasoline). Using ethanol derived from corn grain as liquid fuel would reduce nonrenewable energy and greenhouse gas emissions, but would increase acidification, eutrophication and photochemical smog, compared to using gasoline as liquid fuel, if current practices remain unchanged (primarily agricultural practices). The effects of nitrogen fertilizer application on the bioethanol fuel system were studied. To estimate local soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics in biomass cultivation, the DAYCENT model was used, which is the daily time step version of the CENTURY model, a multicompartmental ecosystem model. The system boundary includes corn production, transportation of corn to a dry mill, the dry mill processing steps, transportation of ethanol to users, ethanol fueled vehicle operation, and upstream processes. The effects of planting winter cover crops on the bioethanol fuel system were examined. The potential impact categories considered were nonrenewable energy consumption, greenhouse gas emissions, photochemical smog, acidification, and eutrophication. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the AIChE Annual Meeting (Salt Lake, UT 11/4-9/2007).",
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