Energy in chemical manufacturing processes: Gate-to-gate information for life cycle assessment

Seungdo Kim, Michael Overcash

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • 32 Citations

Abstract

Gate-to-gate process energy for 86 chemical manufacturing processes is presented. The estimation of the process energy follows design-based methodology. Results show that the gate-to-gate process energy for half of organic chemicals ranges from 0 to 4 MJ per kg, and for half of inorganic chemicals ranges from -1 to 3 MJ per kg. The main energy source in both organic and inorganic processes is steam energy followed by potential recovered energy. In organic chemicals, the fractions of heating oil and electricity use are relatively low, but these fractions are higher in the inorganic chemicals than in the organic chemicals. Furthermore, about 50% of the energy consumed in chemical processes is used for purifying the product, byproduct or recycled stream, which indicates that there are large opportunities for improving the process energy in chemical processes. The information presented in this study is very important for those in the life cycle assessment community in order for them to identify inaccurate information or information not based on actual process design. However, the range for the entire range of chemicals is very substantial and thus reflects the need of the life cycle inventory to separately evaluate the chemistry and degree of purity for chemical products.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages995-1005
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Chemical Technology and Biotechnology
Volume78
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2003

Profile

Chemical Phenomena
Organic Chemicals
Inorganic Chemicals
Life Cycle Stages
Life cycle
manufacturing
life cycle
Organic chemicals
Inorganic chemicals
energy
Electricity
Steam
Heating
chemical process
Oils
Equipment and Supplies
Potential energy
Byproducts
Process design
chemical

Keywords

  • Chemical manufacturing process
  • Chemicals
  • Gate-to-gate process energy
  • LCI energy data
  • Life cycle inventory analysis
  • Process energy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Biotechnology
  • Bioengineering

Cite this

Energy in chemical manufacturing processes : Gate-to-gate information for life cycle assessment. / Kim, Seungdo; Overcash, Michael.

In: Journal of Chemical Technology and Biotechnology, Vol. 78, No. 9, 01.09.2003, p. 995-1005.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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