Engineering enzymes to self-assemble into hydrogels for bioelectrocatalysis

Ian Wheeldon, Elliot Campbell, Scott Calabrese Barton, Scott Banta

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Abstract

    Hydrogels find use in a myriad of applications including electrode modifications for biosensors and biofuel cells. We have developed a general method of protein design to make bi-functional chimeric enzymes such that enzymatic activity is retained and the enzymes self-assemble into robust hydrogel structures. As a proof-of-principle, we have created hydrogels from fluorescent proteins, and we have shown that the physical properties and bulk functionalities of the hydrogels are dependent on the identity, amount, and ratio of each bi-functional block in the gel, thus allowing for the independent tuning of these characteristics. We have created a hydrogel from an oxidoreductase with laccase-like activity, and when this is co-assembled with osmium-modified peptides, biocatalytic activity can be demonstrated which could find utility in a biofuel cell cathode. We have also created hydrogels from a thermostable alcohol dehydrogenase, and mutants of this enzyme will be useful in the construction of biofuel cell anodes.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Title of host publicationACS National Meeting Book of Abstracts
    StatePublished - 2009
    Event238th National Meeting and Exposition of the American Chemical Society, ACS 2009 - Washington, DC, United States

    Other

    Other238th National Meeting and Exposition of the American Chemical Society, ACS 2009
    CountryUnited States
    CityWashington, DC
    Period8/16/098/20/09

    Profile

    Hydrogels
    Carubicin
    Enzymes
    Biological fuel cells
    Proteins
    Coumestrol
    Abducens Nerve
    Autoradiography
    Biosensors
    Autopsy
    Tuning
    Osmium
    Peptides
    Catalyst activity
    Anodes
    Cathodes
    Alcohols
    Gels
    Physical properties
    Electrodes

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Chemistry(all)
    • Chemical Engineering(all)

    Cite this

    Wheeldon, I., Campbell, E., Barton, S. C., & Banta, S. (2009). Engineering enzymes to self-assemble into hydrogels for bioelectrocatalysis. In ACS National Meeting Book of Abstracts

    Engineering enzymes to self-assemble into hydrogels for bioelectrocatalysis. / Wheeldon, Ian; Campbell, Elliot; Barton, Scott Calabrese; Banta, Scott.

    ACS National Meeting Book of Abstracts. 2009.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Wheeldon, I, Campbell, E, Barton, SC & Banta, S 2009, Engineering enzymes to self-assemble into hydrogels for bioelectrocatalysis. in ACS National Meeting Book of Abstracts. 238th National Meeting and Exposition of the American Chemical Society, ACS 2009, Washington, DC, United States, 16-20 August.
    Wheeldon I, Campbell E, Barton SC, Banta S. Engineering enzymes to self-assemble into hydrogels for bioelectrocatalysis. In ACS National Meeting Book of Abstracts. 2009.

    Wheeldon, Ian; Campbell, Elliot; Barton, Scott Calabrese; Banta, Scott / Engineering enzymes to self-assemble into hydrogels for bioelectrocatalysis.

    ACS National Meeting Book of Abstracts. 2009.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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