Exploring sequence space of a new biological nanowire: Kinetics of Γ prefoldin filament formation

Timothy Whitehead, Douglas S. Clark

Research output: ResearchConference contribution

Abstract

Oligomeric proteins hold tremendous promise in creating a range of useful self-assembling structures on the nano- to microscale. Examples in Nature include actin, tubulin, phage virus coat proteins, and the small heat shock protein. Besides allowing for self-assembly in aqueous environments, an additional advantage of proteins is that they can be easily functionalized through standard genetic engineering techniques, enabling incorporation of new chemistries or allowing gene fusions with existing enzymes. We have recently discovered a new type of filamentous protein from an Archaeal microorganism. When assembled in vitro, it forms filaments of polydisperse length, 200 nm - 2 μM, and monodisperse width 8-9 nm and height 3-4 nm, as measured by TEM and AFM. The full-length filament shows a persistence length on the order of 200 nm at room temperature and is stable in a temperature range from 4 to at least 95°C. We describe here the kinetics of filament formation, along with several genetic variants. We also present initial data on potential applications, including ordered enzyme arrays and inorganic templates.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAIChE Annual Meeting, Conference Proceedings
Pages14239
Number of pages1
StatePublished - 2005
Externally publishedYes
Event05AIChE: 2005 AIChE Annual Meeting and Fall Showcase - Cincinnati, OH, United States
Duration: Oct 30 2005Nov 4 2005

Other

Other05AIChE: 2005 AIChE Annual Meeting and Fall Showcase
CountryUnited States
CityCincinnati, OH
Period10/30/0511/4/05

Profile

Nanowires
Proteins
Kinetics
Enzymes
Temperature
Genetic engineering
Bacteriophages
Viruses
Microorganisms
Self assembly
Fusion reactions
Genes
Transmission electron microscopy
Hot Temperature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Whitehead, T., & Clark, D. S. (2005). Exploring sequence space of a new biological nanowire: Kinetics of Γ prefoldin filament formation. In AIChE Annual Meeting, Conference Proceedings (pp. 14239)

Exploring sequence space of a new biological nanowire : Kinetics of Γ prefoldin filament formation. / Whitehead, Timothy; Clark, Douglas S.

AIChE Annual Meeting, Conference Proceedings. 2005. p. 14239.

Research output: ResearchConference contribution

Whitehead, T & Clark, DS 2005, Exploring sequence space of a new biological nanowire: Kinetics of Γ prefoldin filament formation. in AIChE Annual Meeting, Conference Proceedings. pp. 14239, 05AIChE: 2005 AIChE Annual Meeting and Fall Showcase, Cincinnati, OH, United States, 10/30/05.
Whitehead T, Clark DS. Exploring sequence space of a new biological nanowire: Kinetics of Γ prefoldin filament formation. In AIChE Annual Meeting, Conference Proceedings. 2005. p. 14239.
Whitehead, Timothy ; Clark, Douglas S./ Exploring sequence space of a new biological nanowire : Kinetics of Γ prefoldin filament formation. AIChE Annual Meeting, Conference Proceedings. 2005. pp. 14239
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