High pressure catalytic hydrogenation of acetone in a PDMS based recirculating microreactor system

Ketan Pimparkar, Rui Lin, Robert Y. Ofoli, James E. Jackson, Sherine Obare, Dennis J. Miller

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Abstract

    Mass transfer resistances often play a limiting role in gas-liquid-solid reactions. Catalytic hydrogenations are such a class of reactions where high operating pressures and mechanical stirring are used to overcome these resistances. Microreactors1 offer the opportunity to overcome such limitations using large interfacial areas. Their low holdup volumes are advantageous when dealing with hazardous reagents2. Consequently, a number of researchers have looked at conducting hydrogenations in microfluidic setups 3,4. PDMS based microreactors offer the advantages of low cost and ease of manufacture as compared to silica based microreactors5. Yet PDMS based microreactors lack mechanical strength and thus there have been no reports of high pressure (>100 psi) hydrogenations using such a setup. We report the high pressure (725 psi) catalytic hydrogenation of acetone to isopropanol over Ru/C in a PDMS based microreactor. To overcome limitations of the mechanical stability of the PDMS based microreactor to high pressures, a novel arrangement was used wherein the microreactor was placed in a high pressure Parr reactor. Using Ru/C at 40°C and 650 psi hydrogen pressure, 20% acetone conversion to isopropanol was achieved with no byproduct formation.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Title of host publicationAIChE Annual Meeting, Conference Proceedings
    StatePublished - 2008
    Event2008 AIChE Annual Meeting, AIChE 100 - Philadelphia, PA, United States

    Other

    Other2008 AIChE Annual Meeting, AIChE 100
    CountryUnited States
    CityPhiladelphia, PA
    Period11/16/0811/21/08

    Profile

    Biogenic Amines
    Deoxyribonucleoproteins
    Hydrogenation
    Acetone
    Aminoacridines
    Feline Panleukopenia
    Carbimazole
    Butylene Glycols
    Birth Certificates
    Mechanical stability
    Microfluidics
    Byproducts
    Costs
    Strength of materials
    Mass transfer
    Silica
    Hydrogen
    Liquids
    Gases

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Chemical Engineering(all)
    • Chemistry(all)

    Cite this

    High pressure catalytic hydrogenation of acetone in a PDMS based recirculating microreactor system. / Pimparkar, Ketan; Lin, Rui; Ofoli, Robert Y.; Jackson, James E.; Obare, Sherine; Miller, Dennis J.

    AIChE Annual Meeting, Conference Proceedings. 2008.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Pimparkar, K, Lin, R, Ofoli, RY, Jackson, JE, Obare, S & Miller, DJ 2008, High pressure catalytic hydrogenation of acetone in a PDMS based recirculating microreactor system. in AIChE Annual Meeting, Conference Proceedings. 2008 AIChE Annual Meeting, AIChE 100, Philadelphia, PA, United States, 16-21 November.

    Pimparkar, Ketan; Lin, Rui; Ofoli, Robert Y.; Jackson, James E.; Obare, Sherine; Miller, Dennis J. / High pressure catalytic hydrogenation of acetone in a PDMS based recirculating microreactor system.

    AIChE Annual Meeting, Conference Proceedings. 2008.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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    AU - Ofoli,Robert Y.

    AU - Jackson,James E.

    AU - Obare,Sherine

    AU - Miller,Dennis J.

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