High temperature vacuum annealing and hydrogenation modification of exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets

Xiaobing Li, Sanjib Biswas, Lawrence T. Drzal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • 2 Citations

Abstract

Highly active defect sites on the edges of graphene automatically capture oxygen from air to form various oxygen groups. A two-step procedure to remove various oxygen functional groups from the defect sites of exfoliated graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) has been developed to reduce the atomic oxygen concentration from 9.5% to 4.8%. This two-step approach involves high temperature vacuum annealing followed by hydrogenation to protect the reduced edge carbon atoms from recombining with the atmospheric oxygen. The reduced GNPs exhibit decreased surface resistance and graphitic potential-dependent capacitance characteristics compared to the complex potential-dependent capacitance characteristics exhibited by the unreduced GNPs as a result of the removal of the oxygen functional groups present primarily at the edges. These reduced GNPs also exhibit high electrochemical cyclic stability for electrochemical energy storage applications.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Article number638576
JournalJournal of Engineering (United States)
Volume2013
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

Profile

Graphite
Hydrogenation
Graphene
Vacuum
Annealing
Oxygen
Temperature
Functional groups
Capacitance
Surface resistance
Defects
Energy storage
Carbon
Atoms
Air

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Hardware and Architecture

Cite this

High temperature vacuum annealing and hydrogenation modification of exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets. / Li, Xiaobing; Biswas, Sanjib; Drzal, Lawrence T.

In: Journal of Engineering (United States), Vol. 2013, 638576, 2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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