Identification of oleaginous yeast strains able to accumulate high intracellular lipids when cultivated in alkaline pretreated corn stover

Irnayuli R. Sitepu, Mingjie Jin, J. Enrique Fernandez, Leonardo Da Costa Sousa, Venkatesh Balan, Kyria L. Boundy-Mills

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • 21 Citations

Abstract

Microbial oil is a potential alternative to food/plant-derived biodiesel fuel. Our previous screening studies identified a wide range of oleaginous yeast species, using a defined laboratory medium known to stimulate lipid accumulation. In this study, the ability of these yeasts to grow and accumulate lipids was further investigated in synthetic hydrolysate (SynH) and authentic ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX™)-pretreated corn stover hydrolysate (ACSH). Most yeast strains tested were able to accumulate lipids in SynH, but only a few were able to grow and accumulate lipids in ACSH medium. Cryptococcus humicola UCDFST 10-1004 was able to accumulate as high as 15.5 g/L lipids, out of a total of 36 g/L cellular biomass when grown in ACSH, with a cellular lipid content of 40 % of cell dry weight. This lipid production is among the highest reported values for oleaginous yeasts grown in authentic hydrolysate. Preculturing in SynH media with xylose as sole carbon source enabled yeasts to assimilate both glucose and xylose more efficiently in the subsequent hydrolysate medium. This study demonstrates that ACSH is a suitable medium for certain oleaginous yeasts to convert lignocellullosic sugars to triacylglycerols for production of biodiesel and other valuable oleochemicals.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages7645-7657
Number of pages13
JournalApplied Microbiology and Biotechnology
Volume98
Issue number17
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Profile

Zea mays
Yeasts
Lipids
Biofuels
Cryptococcus
Edible Plants
Xylose
Ammonia
Biomass
Oils
Triglycerides
Carbon
Weights and Measures

Keywords

  • Biodiesel
  • Cryptococcus humicola
  • Energy
  • Lignocellulosic
  • Oleochemics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Identification of oleaginous yeast strains able to accumulate high intracellular lipids when cultivated in alkaline pretreated corn stover. / Sitepu, Irnayuli R.; Jin, Mingjie; Fernandez, J. Enrique; Da Costa Sousa, Leonardo; Balan, Venkatesh; Boundy-Mills, Kyria L.

In: Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology, Vol. 98, No. 17, 2014, p. 7645-7657.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sitepu, Irnayuli R. ; Jin, Mingjie ; Fernandez, J. Enrique ; Da Costa Sousa, Leonardo ; Balan, Venkatesh ; Boundy-Mills, Kyria L./ Identification of oleaginous yeast strains able to accumulate high intracellular lipids when cultivated in alkaline pretreated corn stover. In: Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology. 2014 ; Vol. 98, No. 17. pp. 7645-7657
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