In situ immobilization of palladium nanoparticles in microfluidic reactors and assessment of their catalytic activity

Rui Lin, Ruel G. Freemantle, Nicholas M. Kelly, Thomas R. Fielitz, Sherine O. Obare, Robert Y. Ofoli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

We report on the synthesis and characterization of catalytic palladium nanoparticles (Pd NPs) and their immobilization in microfluidic reactors fabricated from polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). The Pd NPs were stabilized with D-biotin or 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTMS) to promote immobilization inside the microfluidic reactors. The NPs were homogeneous with narrow size distributions between 2 and 4 nm, and were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected-area electron diffraction (SAED), and x-ray diffraction (XRD). Biotinylated Pd NPs were immobilized on APTMS-modified PDMS and glass surfaces through the formation of covalent amide bonds between activated biotin and surface amino groups. By contrast, APTMS-stabilized Pd NPs were immobilized directly onto PDMS and glass surfaces rich in hydroxyl groups. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results showed successful attachment of both types of Pd NPs on glass and PDMS surfaces. Both types of Pd NPs were then immobilized in situ in sealed PDMS microfluidic reactors after similar surface modification. The effectiveness of immobilization in the microfluidic reactors was evaluated by hydrogenation of 6-bromo-1-hexene at room temperature and one atmosphere of hydrogen pressure. An average first-run conversion of 85% and selectivity of 100% were achieved in approximately 18 min of reaction time. Control experiments showed that no hydrogenation occurred in the absence of the nanocatalysts. This system has the potential to provide a reliable tool for efficient and high throughput evaluation of catalytic NPs, along with assessment of intrinsic kinetics.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Article number325605
JournalNanotechnology
Volume21
Issue number32
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 21 2010

Profile

Palladium
Microfluidics
Polydimethylsiloxane
Catalyst activity
Nanoparticles
Biotin
Glass
Hydrogenation
X rays
Photoelectron spectroscopy
Amides
Electron diffraction
Hydroxyl Radical
Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy
Surface treatment
Hydrogen
Diffraction
Throughput
baysilon
Transmission electron microscopy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Bioengineering
  • Chemistry(all)
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Materials Science(all)

Cite this

In situ immobilization of palladium nanoparticles in microfluidic reactors and assessment of their catalytic activity. / Lin, Rui; Freemantle, Ruel G.; Kelly, Nicholas M.; Fielitz, Thomas R.; Obare, Sherine O.; Ofoli, Robert Y.

In: Nanotechnology, Vol. 21, No. 32, 325605, 21.07.2010.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lin, Rui ; Freemantle, Ruel G. ; Kelly, Nicholas M. ; Fielitz, Thomas R. ; Obare, Sherine O. ; Ofoli, Robert Y./ In situ immobilization of palladium nanoparticles in microfluidic reactors and assessment of their catalytic activity. In: Nanotechnology. 2010 ; Vol. 21, No. 32.
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