In vivo detection of single cells by MRI

Erik M. Shapiro, Kathryn Sharer, Stanko Skrtic, Alan P. Koretsky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • 279 Citations

Abstract

The use of high-relaxivity, intracellular contrast agents has enabled MRI monitoring of cell migration through and homing to various tissues, such as brain, spinal cord, heart, and muscle. Here it is shown that MRI can detect single cells in vivo, homing to tissue, following cell labeling and transplantation. Primary mouse hepatocytes were double-labeled with green fluorescent 1.63-μm iron oxide particles and red fluorescent endosomal labeling dye, and injected into the spleens of recipient mice. This is a common hepatocyte transplantation paradigm in rodents whereby hepatocytes migrate from the spleen to the liver as single cells. One month later the animals underwent in vivo MRI and punctuated, dark contrast regions were detected scattered through the livers. MRI of perfused, fixed samples and labeled hepatocyte phantoms in combination with histological evaluation confirmed the presence of dispersed single hepatocytes grafted into the livers. Appropriate controls were used to determine whether the observed contrast could have been due to dead cells or free particles, and the results confirmed that the contrast was due to disperse, single cells. Detecting single cells in vivo opens the door to a number of experiments, such as monitoring rare cellular events, assessing the kinetics of stem cell homing, and achieving early detection of metastases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)242-249
Number of pages8
JournalMagnetic Resonance in Medicine
Volume55
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2006
Externally publishedYes

Profile

Hepatocytes
Liver
Spleen
Cell Transplantation
Oxides
Contrast Media
Cell Movement
Rodentia
Spinal Cord
Myocardium
Coloring Agents
Stem Cells
Iron
Transplantation
Neoplasm Metastasis
Brain

Keywords

  • Cells
  • Contrast agents
  • Iron oxide
  • Liver
  • MRI

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Shapiro, E. M., Sharer, K., Skrtic, S., & Koretsky, A. P. (2006). In vivo detection of single cells by MRI. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, 55(2), 242-249. DOI: 10.1002/mrm.20718

In vivo detection of single cells by MRI. / Shapiro, Erik M.; Sharer, Kathryn; Skrtic, Stanko; Koretsky, Alan P.

In: Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, Vol. 55, No. 2, 02.2006, p. 242-249.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shapiro, EM, Sharer, K, Skrtic, S & Koretsky, AP 2006, 'In vivo detection of single cells by MRI' Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, vol 55, no. 2, pp. 242-249. DOI: 10.1002/mrm.20718
Shapiro EM, Sharer K, Skrtic S, Koretsky AP. In vivo detection of single cells by MRI. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. 2006 Feb;55(2):242-249. Available from, DOI: 10.1002/mrm.20718

Shapiro, Erik M.; Sharer, Kathryn; Skrtic, Stanko; Koretsky, Alan P. / In vivo detection of single cells by MRI.

In: Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, Vol. 55, No. 2, 02.2006, p. 242-249.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{8527dcbef5704fffa28e807501c2c302,
title = "In vivo detection of single cells by MRI",
abstract = "The use of high-relaxivity, intracellular contrast agents has enabled MRI monitoring of cell migration through and homing to various tissues, such as brain, spinal cord, heart, and muscle. Here it is shown that MRI can detect single cells in vivo, homing to tissue, following cell labeling and transplantation. Primary mouse hepatocytes were double-labeled with green fluorescent 1.63-μm iron oxide particles and red fluorescent endosomal labeling dye, and injected into the spleens of recipient mice. This is a common hepatocyte transplantation paradigm in rodents whereby hepatocytes migrate from the spleen to the liver as single cells. One month later the animals underwent in vivo MRI and punctuated, dark contrast regions were detected scattered through the livers. MRI of perfused, fixed samples and labeled hepatocyte phantoms in combination with histological evaluation confirmed the presence of dispersed single hepatocytes grafted into the livers. Appropriate controls were used to determine whether the observed contrast could have been due to dead cells or free particles, and the results confirmed that the contrast was due to disperse, single cells. Detecting single cells in vivo opens the door to a number of experiments, such as monitoring rare cellular events, assessing the kinetics of stem cell homing, and achieving early detection of metastases.",
keywords = "Cells, Contrast agents, Iron oxide, Liver, MRI",
author = "Shapiro, {Erik M.} and Kathryn Sharer and Stanko Skrtic and Koretsky, {Alan P.}",
year = "2006",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1002/mrm.20718",
volume = "55",
pages = "242--249",
journal = "Magnetic Resonance in Medicine",
issn = "0740-3194",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - In vivo detection of single cells by MRI

AU - Shapiro,Erik M.

AU - Sharer,Kathryn

AU - Skrtic,Stanko

AU - Koretsky,Alan P.

PY - 2006/2

Y1 - 2006/2

N2 - The use of high-relaxivity, intracellular contrast agents has enabled MRI monitoring of cell migration through and homing to various tissues, such as brain, spinal cord, heart, and muscle. Here it is shown that MRI can detect single cells in vivo, homing to tissue, following cell labeling and transplantation. Primary mouse hepatocytes were double-labeled with green fluorescent 1.63-μm iron oxide particles and red fluorescent endosomal labeling dye, and injected into the spleens of recipient mice. This is a common hepatocyte transplantation paradigm in rodents whereby hepatocytes migrate from the spleen to the liver as single cells. One month later the animals underwent in vivo MRI and punctuated, dark contrast regions were detected scattered through the livers. MRI of perfused, fixed samples and labeled hepatocyte phantoms in combination with histological evaluation confirmed the presence of dispersed single hepatocytes grafted into the livers. Appropriate controls were used to determine whether the observed contrast could have been due to dead cells or free particles, and the results confirmed that the contrast was due to disperse, single cells. Detecting single cells in vivo opens the door to a number of experiments, such as monitoring rare cellular events, assessing the kinetics of stem cell homing, and achieving early detection of metastases.

AB - The use of high-relaxivity, intracellular contrast agents has enabled MRI monitoring of cell migration through and homing to various tissues, such as brain, spinal cord, heart, and muscle. Here it is shown that MRI can detect single cells in vivo, homing to tissue, following cell labeling and transplantation. Primary mouse hepatocytes were double-labeled with green fluorescent 1.63-μm iron oxide particles and red fluorescent endosomal labeling dye, and injected into the spleens of recipient mice. This is a common hepatocyte transplantation paradigm in rodents whereby hepatocytes migrate from the spleen to the liver as single cells. One month later the animals underwent in vivo MRI and punctuated, dark contrast regions were detected scattered through the livers. MRI of perfused, fixed samples and labeled hepatocyte phantoms in combination with histological evaluation confirmed the presence of dispersed single hepatocytes grafted into the livers. Appropriate controls were used to determine whether the observed contrast could have been due to dead cells or free particles, and the results confirmed that the contrast was due to disperse, single cells. Detecting single cells in vivo opens the door to a number of experiments, such as monitoring rare cellular events, assessing the kinetics of stem cell homing, and achieving early detection of metastases.

KW - Cells

KW - Contrast agents

KW - Iron oxide

KW - Liver

KW - MRI

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=32544454812&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=32544454812&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/mrm.20718

DO - 10.1002/mrm.20718

M3 - Article

VL - 55

SP - 242

EP - 249

JO - Magnetic Resonance in Medicine

T2 - Magnetic Resonance in Medicine

JF - Magnetic Resonance in Medicine

SN - 0740-3194

IS - 2

ER -