Intact transfer of layered bionanocomposite arrays

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Microarrays containing multiple, nanostructured layers of biological materials would enable highthroughput screening of drug candidates, investigation of protein-mediated cell adhesion, and fabrication of novel biosensors. In this presentation, we will present an approach that allows high-quality microarrays of layered, bionanocomposite films to be deposited on a wide variety of substrates. The approach uses layer-by-layer self-assembly to preestablish a multilayered structure on an elastomeric stamp, and then uses microcontact printing to transfer the 3-D structure intact to the target surface. This approach extends the method previously used for intact transfer polyelectrolyte multiplayer patterns to include amphiphilic biomolecules, such as proteins. The approach overcomes a problem encountered when using microcontact printing to establish a pattern on the target surface and then building sequential layers on the pattern via layer-by-layer self-assembly. Amphiphilic molecules tend to adsorb both to the patterned features as well as the underlying substrate, resulting in low-quality patterns. By circumventing this problem, this research significantly extends the range of surfaces and layering constituents that can be used to fabricate 3D, patterned, bionanocomposite structures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAIChE Annual Meeting, Conference Proceedings
Pages5005
Number of pages1
StatePublished - 2005
Externally publishedYes
Event05AIChE: 2005 AIChE Annual Meeting and Fall Showcase - Cincinnati, OH, United States

Other

Other05AIChE: 2005 AIChE Annual Meeting and Fall Showcase
CountryUnited States
CityCincinnati, OH
Period10/30/0511/4/05

Profile

Microarrays
Self assembly
Printing
Proteins
Substrates
Cell adhesion
Biomolecules
Polyelectrolytes
Biosensors
Biological materials
Screening
Fabrication
Molecules

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Kohli, N., Worden, R. M., & Lee, I. (2005). Intact transfer of layered bionanocomposite arrays. In AIChE Annual Meeting, Conference Proceedings (pp. 5005)

Intact transfer of layered bionanocomposite arrays. / Kohli, Neeraj; Worden, Robert M.; Lee, Ilsoon.

AIChE Annual Meeting, Conference Proceedings. 2005. p. 5005.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Kohli, N, Worden, RM & Lee, I 2005, Intact transfer of layered bionanocomposite arrays. in AIChE Annual Meeting, Conference Proceedings. pp. 5005, 05AIChE: 2005 AIChE Annual Meeting and Fall Showcase, Cincinnati, OH, United States, 30-4 November.
Kohli N, Worden RM, Lee I. Intact transfer of layered bionanocomposite arrays. In AIChE Annual Meeting, Conference Proceedings. 2005. p. 5005.

Kohli, Neeraj; Worden, Robert M.; Lee, Ilsoon / Intact transfer of layered bionanocomposite arrays.

AIChE Annual Meeting, Conference Proceedings. 2005. p. 5005.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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