Integrating computational transport phenomena into the undergraduate chemical engineering curriculum

Karuna S. Koppula, André Bénard, Charles A. Petty, Nilesh Gandhi, Ajay Parihar, Shane Moeykens

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Abstract

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and visualization tools have advanced to the point where commercial CFD software can readily be integrated into the engineering curriculum. These enabling technologies portend a paradigm shift in how next generation undergraduate students will learn about momentum, heat, and mass transfer in reacting and non-reacting fluids. CFD simulations provide a means for understanding physical phenomena and for discussing the consequences of commonly employed design decisions in single phase and multiphase flows. This paper illustrates the practical utility of using CFD to explore the boundaries of traditional transport phenomena problems commonly employed in the undergraduate curriculum and complements an earlier introductory paper on the topic (see Moeykens et al., 2004). Faculty and graduate students at Michigan State University are using Flowlab (www.flowlab.fluent.com) as a teaching aid with freshman, sophomore, and junior level chemical engineering students. Prototypical examples are used to complement specific lectures and/or analysis of experimental data in the laboratory related to unsteady state heat transfer, developing flow in a pipe at low Reynolds numbers, expanding flow in a pipe, radial flow between parallel disks, and batch sedimentation. Figure 1 illustrates results recently developed by students for the entry length problem in pipe flow. This interesting example, and others, will be used to illustrate how a CFD "experiment" can be used to support a classroom discussion about the physical nature of transport phenomena and the limitations of empirical correlations.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Title of host publicationAIChE Annual Meeting, Conference Proceedings
    StatePublished - 2006
    Event2006 AIChE Annual Meeting - San Francisco, CA, United States

    Other

    Other2006 AIChE Annual Meeting
    CountryUnited States
    CitySan Francisco, CA
    Period11/12/0611/17/06

    Profile

    Collagen Type XII
    Computational fluid dynamics
    Neurophysiological Recruitment
    Students
    Curricula
    Algestone
    Arginine Kinase
    Chemical engineering
    Pipe
    Heat transfer
    Nerve Tissue Proteins
    Acyclic Acids
    Common Bile Duct Diseases
    Feline Panleukopenia
    Pirinitramide
    Acromion
    Hydroxy Acids
    Essential Amino Acids
    Amoxicillin
    Pipe flow

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Chemical Engineering(all)
    • Chemistry(all)

    Cite this

    Koppula, K. S., Bénard, A., Petty, C. A., Gandhi, N., Parihar, A., & Moeykens, S. (2006). Integrating computational transport phenomena into the undergraduate chemical engineering curriculum. In AIChE Annual Meeting, Conference Proceedings

    Integrating computational transport phenomena into the undergraduate chemical engineering curriculum. / Koppula, Karuna S.; Bénard, André; Petty, Charles A.; Gandhi, Nilesh; Parihar, Ajay; Moeykens, Shane.

    AIChE Annual Meeting, Conference Proceedings. 2006.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Koppula, KS, Bénard, A, Petty, CA, Gandhi, N, Parihar, A & Moeykens, S 2006, Integrating computational transport phenomena into the undergraduate chemical engineering curriculum. in AIChE Annual Meeting, Conference Proceedings. 2006 AIChE Annual Meeting, San Francisco, CA, United States, 12-17 November.
    Koppula KS, Bénard A, Petty CA, Gandhi N, Parihar A, Moeykens S. Integrating computational transport phenomena into the undergraduate chemical engineering curriculum. In AIChE Annual Meeting, Conference Proceedings. 2006.

    Koppula, Karuna S.; Bénard, André; Petty, Charles A.; Gandhi, Nilesh; Parihar, Ajay; Moeykens, Shane / Integrating computational transport phenomena into the undergraduate chemical engineering curriculum.

    AIChE Annual Meeting, Conference Proceedings. 2006.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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