Integrating material/part/process design for polymer composites: A knowledge-based problem-solving approach

James K. Mcdowell, Ahmed M. Kamel, Jon Sticklen, Martin C. Hawley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • 3 Citations

Abstract

Polymer composites provide the opportunity to design the material as well as the part. The domain for composites design can be viewed along three dimensions, namely material design, part design, and process design. These dimensions are not independent, and their interactions create important bottlenecks in manufacturing. Integrating these material/part/process issues becomes increasingly important as composite materials penetrate the durable goods markets and as high-performance markets become more and more cost conscious. Often these bottlenecks are caused by lack of strategic knowledge or the application of knowledge in the wrong context. To address these challenges and facilitate the use of polymer composites, a problem-solving architecture for integrated material/part/process design is being developed that makes use of knowledge-based systems (KBS) technology. The goal is to bring to bear the necessary decision-making knowledge at important junctions in the design procedure. Our current implementations include a system for material design and a system for elementary process design in the form of process technology selection. These systems and the problem-solving architecture are founded on a particular approach to KBS known as Generic Task Theory. These software systems are described in terms of their behavior, the underlying domain assumptions, and the knowledge representation constructs and inferences used in design problem solving.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages218-238
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Thermoplastic Composite Materials
Volume9
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jul 1996

Profile

problem solving
Process design
Polymers
composite materials
Composite materials
polymers
Knowledge based systems
knowledge based systems
Knowledge representation
knowledge representation
decision making
Decision making
bears
inference
manufacturing
costs
computer programs
Costs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ceramics and Composites

Cite this

Integrating material/part/process design for polymer composites : A knowledge-based problem-solving approach. / Mcdowell, James K.; Kamel, Ahmed M.; Sticklen, Jon; Hawley, Martin C.

In: Journal of Thermoplastic Composite Materials, Vol. 9, No. 3, 07.1996, p. 218-238.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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