Magnetic resonance velocity imaging: A new method for prosthetic heart valve study

P. G. Walker, E. M. Pedersen, S. Oyre, L. Flepp, S. Ringgaard, R. S. Heinrich, S. P. Walton, J. M. Hasenkam, H. S. Jorgensen, A. P. Yoganathan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The aim of this study was to compare different (long/short echo time, whole body/small bore scanner) magnetic resonance velocity measurement techniques and their applicability to the measurement of blood velocity downstream of prosthetic heart valves. In-vitro magnetic resonance velocity measurements were performed downstream of four normal and stenotic prosthetic heart valves (St. Jude Medical bileaflet, Monostrut tilting disc, Ionescu-Shiley pericardial and Starr-Edwards caged-ball) under steady flow conditions in an aortic test chamber. Cross-sectional and longitudinal velocity images were obtained downstream of the valves. Magnetic resonance was able to measure all three components of fluid velocity downstream of the valves under normal and stenotic conditions except in regions of turbulence. The velocity was measured across the tube cross-section in 10-15 minutes producing a good visualization of the axial velocity profile. High velocity regions, shear layers and reversed/stagnant regions were identified. The flow rate calculated by integration of the magnetic resonance velocity across the cross-section of the tube was accurate to 56% in normal cases and slightly less accurate for stenotic valves. Although signal loss on the modulus image was adverse to the velocity images, it was found that these regions could be used to identify areas of flow disturbance. The high magnetic field, small bore scanner was able to produce images with a resolution of 0.2 x 0.2 x 1.0 mm and was less affected by turbulence producing more detailed flow images. Magnetic resonance has been shown to be a useful new tool in the measurement of the velocity downstream of prosthetic heart valves. In particular it's short data acquisition time and the possibilities to reproduce the same measurements in-vivo make it an attractive alternative to traditional methods.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)296-307
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Heart Valve Disease
Volume4
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

Profile

Heart Valves
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Magnetic Fields
In Vitro Techniques

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Walker, P. G., Pedersen, E. M., Oyre, S., Flepp, L., Ringgaard, S., Heinrich, R. S., ... Yoganathan, A. P. (1995). Magnetic resonance velocity imaging: A new method for prosthetic heart valve study. Journal of Heart Valve Disease, 4(3), 296-307.

Magnetic resonance velocity imaging : A new method for prosthetic heart valve study. / Walker, P. G.; Pedersen, E. M.; Oyre, S.; Flepp, L.; Ringgaard, S.; Heinrich, R. S.; Walton, S. P.; Hasenkam, J. M.; Jorgensen, H. S.; Yoganathan, A. P.

In: Journal of Heart Valve Disease, Vol. 4, No. 3, 1995, p. 296-307.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Walker, PG, Pedersen, EM, Oyre, S, Flepp, L, Ringgaard, S, Heinrich, RS, Walton, SP, Hasenkam, JM, Jorgensen, HS & Yoganathan, AP 1995, 'Magnetic resonance velocity imaging: A new method for prosthetic heart valve study' Journal of Heart Valve Disease, vol 4, no. 3, pp. 296-307.
Walker PG, Pedersen EM, Oyre S, Flepp L, Ringgaard S, Heinrich RS et al. Magnetic resonance velocity imaging: A new method for prosthetic heart valve study. Journal of Heart Valve Disease. 1995;4(3):296-307.

Walker, P. G.; Pedersen, E. M.; Oyre, S.; Flepp, L.; Ringgaard, S.; Heinrich, R. S.; Walton, S. P.; Hasenkam, J. M.; Jorgensen, H. S.; Yoganathan, A. P. / Magnetic resonance velocity imaging : A new method for prosthetic heart valve study.

In: Journal of Heart Valve Disease, Vol. 4, No. 3, 1995, p. 296-307.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "The aim of this study was to compare different (long/short echo time, whole body/small bore scanner) magnetic resonance velocity measurement techniques and their applicability to the measurement of blood velocity downstream of prosthetic heart valves. In-vitro magnetic resonance velocity measurements were performed downstream of four normal and stenotic prosthetic heart valves (St. Jude Medical bileaflet, Monostrut tilting disc, Ionescu-Shiley pericardial and Starr-Edwards caged-ball) under steady flow conditions in an aortic test chamber. Cross-sectional and longitudinal velocity images were obtained downstream of the valves. Magnetic resonance was able to measure all three components of fluid velocity downstream of the valves under normal and stenotic conditions except in regions of turbulence. The velocity was measured across the tube cross-section in 10-15 minutes producing a good visualization of the axial velocity profile. High velocity regions, shear layers and reversed/stagnant regions were identified. The flow rate calculated by integration of the magnetic resonance velocity across the cross-section of the tube was accurate to 56% in normal cases and slightly less accurate for stenotic valves. Although signal loss on the modulus image was adverse to the velocity images, it was found that these regions could be used to identify areas of flow disturbance. The high magnetic field, small bore scanner was able to produce images with a resolution of 0.2 x 0.2 x 1.0 mm and was less affected by turbulence producing more detailed flow images. Magnetic resonance has been shown to be a useful new tool in the measurement of the velocity downstream of prosthetic heart valves. In particular it's short data acquisition time and the possibilities to reproduce the same measurements in-vivo make it an attractive alternative to traditional methods.",
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