Microwave processing of natural fiber composites and their characterization

Nikki Sgriccia, Martin C. Hawley, Manjusri Misra

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Abstract

    There is a growing urgency to develop and commercialize new bio-based products and innovative technologies that can reduce dependence on foreign oil, at the same time, enhance national security, the environment, and the economy. Renewable, Recyclable, and Sustainable - - all can make a difference in the environment today and tomorrow. By the year 2020 dependence on foreign oil for domestic use is expected to grow by over 65%. As fossil fuel supplies continue to dwindle and pressure is placed on industry to find alternative bio-based material, the demand is surging for renewable resources and related technology. Eco-friendly natural / bio-fiber is a logical materials feedstock and has potential as a replacement/substitute for glass fiber in fiber-reinforced composites for various applications especially in automotive and building products industries. Experiments have been performed to investigate the effectiveness of microwave curing of natural fiber reinforced biocomposites. Chopped industrial hemp, flax, kenaf, henequen and glass (15 weight percent) reinforced epoxy (Diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A (DGEBA) cured with diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS)) composites were studied. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) were used to investigate material properties. Samples were processed using both microwave and thermal curing for comparison. Several composites reached a greater final extent of cure with microwave curing. These developed biocomposites can have different industrial applications in automotive, marine industries, recreation equipments, and farm equipments, and so on in the future.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Title of host publicationGlobal Plastics Environmental Conference 2005: GPEC 2005 - Creating Sustainability for the Environment
    Pages711
    Number of pages1
    StatePublished - 2005
    EventGlobal Plastics Environmental Conference 2005: GPEC 2005 - Creating Sustainability for the Environment - Atlanta, GA, United States

    Other

    OtherGlobal Plastics Environmental Conference 2005: GPEC 2005 - Creating Sustainability for the Environment
    CountryUnited States
    CityAtlanta, GA
    Period2/23/052/25/05

    Profile

    Microwaves
    Composite materials
    Curing
    Industry
    Natural fibers
    Fibers
    Agricultural machinery
    Hemp
    Flax
    National security
    Fossil fuels
    Glass fibers
    Feedstocks
    Industrial applications
    Thermogravimetric analysis
    Differential scanning calorimetry
    Ethers
    Materials properties
    Glass
    Scanning electron microscopy

    Keywords

    • Biocomposites
    • Epoxy resin
    • Flax
    • Henequen and glass
    • Industrial hemp
    • Kenaf
    • Microwave curing
    • Natural fiber

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Engineering(all)

    Cite this

    Sgriccia, N., Hawley, M. C., & Misra, M. (2005). Microwave processing of natural fiber composites and their characterization. In Global Plastics Environmental Conference 2005: GPEC 2005 - Creating Sustainability for the Environment (pp. 711)

    Microwave processing of natural fiber composites and their characterization. / Sgriccia, Nikki; Hawley, Martin C.; Misra, Manjusri.

    Global Plastics Environmental Conference 2005: GPEC 2005 - Creating Sustainability for the Environment. 2005. p. 711.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Sgriccia, N, Hawley, MC & Misra, M 2005, Microwave processing of natural fiber composites and their characterization. in Global Plastics Environmental Conference 2005: GPEC 2005 - Creating Sustainability for the Environment. pp. 711, Global Plastics Environmental Conference 2005: GPEC 2005 - Creating Sustainability for the Environment, Atlanta, GA, United States, 23-25 February.
    Sgriccia N, Hawley MC, Misra M. Microwave processing of natural fiber composites and their characterization. In Global Plastics Environmental Conference 2005: GPEC 2005 - Creating Sustainability for the Environment. 2005. p. 711.

    Sgriccia, Nikki; Hawley, Martin C.; Misra, Manjusri / Microwave processing of natural fiber composites and their characterization.

    Global Plastics Environmental Conference 2005: GPEC 2005 - Creating Sustainability for the Environment. 2005. p. 711.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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