Modeling the emetic potencies of food-borne trichothecenes by benchmark dose methodology

Denis Male, Wenda Wu, Nicole J. Mitchell, Steven Bursian, James J. Pestka, Felicia Wu

    Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

    • 5 Citations

    Abstract

    Trichothecene mycotoxins commonly co-contaminate cereal products. They cause immunosuppression, anorexia, and emesis in multiple species. Dietary exposure to such toxins often occurs in mixtures. Hence, if it were possible to determine their relative toxicities and assign toxic equivalency factors (TEFs) to each trichothecene, risk management and regulation of these mycotoxins could become more comprehensive and simple. We used a mink emesis model to compare the toxicities of deoxynivalenol, 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol, 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol, nivalenol, fusarenon-X, HT-2 toxin, and T-2 toxin. These toxins were administered to mink via gavage and intraperitoneal injection. The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) benchmark dose software was used to determine benchmark doses for each trichothecene. The relative potencies of each of these toxins were calculated as the ratios of their benchmark doses to that of DON. Our results showed that mink were more sensitive to orally administered toxins than to toxins administered by IP. T-2 and HT-2 toxins caused the greatest emetic responses, followed by FX, and then by DON, its acetylated derivatives, and NIV. Although these results provide key information on comparative toxicities, there is still a need for more animal based studies focusing on various endpoints and combined effects of trichothecenes before TEFs can be established.

    LanguageEnglish (US)
    Pages178-185
    Number of pages8
    JournalFood and Chemical Toxicology
    Volume94
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Aug 1 2016

    Profile

    Trichothecenes
    Emetics
    Benchmarking
    Food
    emetics
    trichothecenes
    toxins
    dosage
    methodology
    Mink
    Toxicity
    mink
    toxicity
    Mycotoxins
    Poisons
    Vomiting
    HT-2 toxin
    mycotoxins
    T-2 Toxin
    United States Environmental Protection Agency

    Keywords

    • Deoxynivalenol
    • Emesis
    • Mycotoxins
    • Toxic equivalency factor

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Food Science
    • Toxicology

    Cite this

    Modeling the emetic potencies of food-borne trichothecenes by benchmark dose methodology. / Male, Denis; Wu, Wenda; Mitchell, Nicole J.; Bursian, Steven; Pestka, James J.; Wu, Felicia.

    In: Food and Chemical Toxicology, Vol. 94, 01.08.2016, p. 178-185.

    Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

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