MRI detection of single particles for cellular imaging

Erik M. Shapiro, Stanko Skrtic, Kathryn Sharer, Jonathan M. Hill, Cynthia E. Dunbar, Alan P. Koretsky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • 358 Citations

Abstract

There is rapid growth in the use of MRI for molecular and cellular imaging. Much of this work relies on the high relaxivity of nanometer-sized, ultrasmall dextran-coated iron oxide particles. Typically, millions of dextran-coated ultrasmall iron oxide particles must be loaded into cells for efficient detection. Here we show that single, micrometer-sized iron oxide particles (MPIOs) can be detected by MRI in vitro in agarose samples, in cultured cells, and in mouse embryos. Experiments studying effects of MRI resolution and particle size from 0.76 to 1.63 μm indicated that T2 effects can be readily detected from single MPIOs at 50-μm resolution and significant signal effects could be detected at resolutions as low as 200 μm. Cultured cells were labeled with fluorescent MPIOs such that single particles were present in individual cells. These single particles in single cells could be detected both by MRI and fluorescence microscopy. Finally, single particles injected into single-cell-stage mouse embryos could be detected at embryonic day 11.5, demonstrating that even after many cell divisions, daughter cells still carry individual particles. These results demonstrate that MRI can detect single particles and indicate that single-particle detection will be useful for cellular imaging.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)10901-10906
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume101
Issue number30
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 27 2004
Externally publishedYes

Profile

Oxides
Iron
Dextrans
Cultured Cells
Embryonic Structures
Molecular Imaging
Fluorescence Microscopy
Particle Size
Cell Division
Sepharose
In Vitro Techniques

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • General

Cite this

MRI detection of single particles for cellular imaging. / Shapiro, Erik M.; Skrtic, Stanko; Sharer, Kathryn; Hill, Jonathan M.; Dunbar, Cynthia E.; Koretsky, Alan P.

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 101, No. 30, 27.07.2004, p. 10901-10906.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shapiro EM, Skrtic S, Sharer K, Hill JM, Dunbar CE, Koretsky AP. MRI detection of single particles for cellular imaging. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 2004 Jul 27;101(30):10901-10906. Available from, DOI: 10.1073/pnas.0403918101

Shapiro, Erik M.; Skrtic, Stanko; Sharer, Kathryn; Hill, Jonathan M.; Dunbar, Cynthia E.; Koretsky, Alan P. / MRI detection of single particles for cellular imaging.

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 101, No. 30, 27.07.2004, p. 10901-10906.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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