Novel lignocellulosic biomass pretreatment using a modified Taylor-Couette mixer for biofuels and biomaterials

Wei Wang, Ilsoon Lee

    Research output: ResearchConference contribution

    Abstract

    Bioethanol derived from lignocellulosic biomass can be a good candidate for energy alternative, not only because lignocellulosic biomass is abundant and sustainable, but also bioethanol production forms carbon cycle in a more timely fashion compared to fossil fuel, which leads to reduction of green gas emission. Lignocellulosic biomass pretreatment, which is one of the essential steps in bioethanol production, accounts for the majority portion of the overall bioethanol production cost. Hence an effective and efficient pretreatment method is highly demanded. Although this research area has been deeply investigated several decades ago, it has not attracted tremendous attention until recently. In our research, cost-effective and breakthrough biomass pretreatment was conducted with a novel modified Taylor-Couette mixing system, aiming to overcome the natural recalcitrance of lignocellulosic biomass in a short processing time and facilitate a better accessibility of enzymes to polysaccharides. Compositional analysis proved significant removals in both lignin and hemicellulose and rich glucan content left in the residue only after 2 minutes or less. Parameters like mixing speed, retention time, biomass loading and corresponding enzyme digestibility will be presented.

    LanguageEnglish (US)
    Title of host publication11AIChE - 2011 AIChE Annual Meeting, Conference Proceedings
    StatePublished - 2011
    Event2011 AIChE Annual Meeting, 11AIChE - Minneapolis, MN, United States
    Duration: Oct 16 2011Oct 21 2011

    Other

    Other2011 AIChE Annual Meeting, 11AIChE
    CountryUnited States
    CityMinneapolis, MN
    Period10/16/1110/21/11

    Profile

    Biofuels
    Biocompatible Materials
    Biomass
    Biomaterials
    Bioethanol
    Enzymes
    Costs
    Glucans
    Lignin
    Gas emissions
    Fossil fuels
    Polysaccharides
    Carbon
    Processing
    hemicellulose

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Chemical Engineering(all)

    Cite this

    Wang, W., & Lee, I. (2011). Novel lignocellulosic biomass pretreatment using a modified Taylor-Couette mixer for biofuels and biomaterials. In 11AIChE - 2011 AIChE Annual Meeting, Conference Proceedings

    Novel lignocellulosic biomass pretreatment using a modified Taylor-Couette mixer for biofuels and biomaterials. / Wang, Wei; Lee, Ilsoon.

    11AIChE - 2011 AIChE Annual Meeting, Conference Proceedings. 2011.

    Research output: ResearchConference contribution

    Wang, W & Lee, I 2011, Novel lignocellulosic biomass pretreatment using a modified Taylor-Couette mixer for biofuels and biomaterials. in 11AIChE - 2011 AIChE Annual Meeting, Conference Proceedings. 2011 AIChE Annual Meeting, 11AIChE, Minneapolis, MN, United States, 10/16/11.
    Wang W, Lee I. Novel lignocellulosic biomass pretreatment using a modified Taylor-Couette mixer for biofuels and biomaterials. In 11AIChE - 2011 AIChE Annual Meeting, Conference Proceedings. 2011.
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