Optical Engine Operation to Attain Piston Temperatures Representative of Metal Engine Conditions

Ravi Teja Vedula, Thomas Stuecken, Harold Schock, Cody Squibb, Ken Hardman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • 1 Citations

Abstract

Piston temperature plays a major role in determining details of fuel spray vaporization, fuel film deposition and the resulting combustion in direct-injection engines. Due to different heat transfer properties that occur in optical and all-metal engines, it becomes an inevitable requirement to verify the piston temperatures in both engine configurations before carrying out optical engine studies. A novel Spot Infrared-based Temperature (SIR-T) technique was developed to measure the piston window temperature in an optical engine. Chromium spots of 200 nm thickness were vacuum-arc deposited at different locations on a sapphire window. An infrared (IR) camera was used to record the intensity of radiation emitted by the deposited spots. From a set of calibration experiments, a relation was established between the IR camera measurements of these spots and the surface temperature measured by a thermocouple. Transmissivity of the chromium spot was investigated by using different background media. The deviations between the thermocouple readings and SIR-T measured temperatures were noted to be within 10°C for the working range of 75°C to 180°C. The technique was demonstrated to measure the optical piston temperature during engine operation at 1500 rpm and 2000 rpm. A piston warm-up strategy was implemented for optical engine studies to attain metal engine steady state piston temperatures. The effect of piston warm-up on in-cylinder soot formation was studied using high-speed imaging.

LanguageEnglish (US)
JournalSAE International Journal of Engines
Volume10
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 28 2017

Profile

Pistons
Engines
Metals
Temperature
Infrared radiation
Thermocouples
Chromium
Cameras
Direct injection
Engine cylinders
Soot
Vaporization
Sapphire
Calibration
Vacuum
Heat transfer
Imaging techniques
Radiation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Automotive Engineering
  • Fuel Technology

Cite this

Optical Engine Operation to Attain Piston Temperatures Representative of Metal Engine Conditions. / Vedula, Ravi Teja; Stuecken, Thomas; Schock, Harold; Squibb, Cody; Hardman, Ken.

In: SAE International Journal of Engines, Vol. 10, No. 3, 28.03.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vedula, Ravi Teja ; Stuecken, Thomas ; Schock, Harold ; Squibb, Cody ; Hardman, Ken. / Optical Engine Operation to Attain Piston Temperatures Representative of Metal Engine Conditions. In: SAE International Journal of Engines. 2017 ; Vol. 10, No. 3.
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