Optical Engine Operation to Attain Piston Temperatures Representative of Metal Engine Conditions

Ravi Teja Vedula, Thomas Stuecken, Harold Schock, Cody Squibb, Ken Hardman

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Piston temperature plays a major role in determining details of fuel spray vaporization, fuel film deposition and the resulting combustion in direct-injection engines. Due to different heat transfer properties that occur in optical and all-metal engines, it becomes an inevitable requirement to verify the piston temperatures in both engine configurations before carrying out optical engine studies. A novel Spot Infrared-based Temperature (SIR-T) technique was developed to measure the piston window temperature in an optical engine. Chromium spots of 200 nm thickness were vacuum-arc deposited at different locations on a sapphire window. An infrared (IR) camera was used to record the intensity of radiation emitted by the deposited spots. From a set of calibration experiments, a relation was established between the IR camera measurements of these spots and the surface temperature measured by a thermocouple. Transmissivity of the chromium spot was investigated by using different background media. The deviations between the thermocouple readings and SIR-T measured temperatures were noted to be within 10°C for the working range of 75°C to 180°C. The technique was demonstrated to measure the optical piston temperature during engine operation at 1500 rpm and 2000 rpm. A piston warm-up strategy was implemented for optical engine studies to attain metal engine steady state piston temperatures. The effect of piston warm-up on in-cylinder soot formation was studied using high-speed imaging.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    JournalSAE International Journal of Engines
    Volume10
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Mar 28 2017

    Profile

    Engines
    Temperature
    Pistons
    Infrared radiation
    Metals
    Thermocouples
    Chromium
    Cameras
    Direct injection
    Soot
    Vaporization
    Sapphire
    Calibration
    Vacuum
    Heat transfer
    Imaging techniques
    Radiation
    Experiments

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Automotive Engineering
    • Fuel Technology

    Cite this

    Optical Engine Operation to Attain Piston Temperatures Representative of Metal Engine Conditions. / Vedula, Ravi Teja; Stuecken, Thomas; Schock, Harold; Squibb, Cody; Hardman, Ken.

    In: SAE International Journal of Engines, Vol. 10, No. 3, 28.03.2017.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Vedula, Ravi Teja; Stuecken, Thomas; Schock, Harold; Squibb, Cody; Hardman, Ken / Optical Engine Operation to Attain Piston Temperatures Representative of Metal Engine Conditions.

    In: SAE International Journal of Engines, Vol. 10, No. 3, 28.03.2017.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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