Optimum polymer - Solid interface design for adhesion strength: Carboxylation of polybutadiene and mixed silanes surface modification of aluminum oxide

Ilsoon Lee, Richard P. Wool

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • 9 Citations

Abstract

To understand the optimum design of polymer - solid interfaces for adhesion strength, model polymer - solid interfaces of carboxylated polybutadiene (cPBD) adhered to mixed silane modified Al2O3 surfaces were examined. The cPBD, having various - COOH sticker group concentration φ(X) (0 ∼ 10 mol%), was synthesized through high-pressure carboxylation of PBD, while Al2O3 surfaces were modified to have various - NH2 density, φ(Y) (0 ∼ 100 mol%), using self-assembly of mixed amine- and methyl-terminated silanes. The coadsorption kinetic model of the two silanes was analyzed through X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscope (AFM), and dynamic contact angle (DCA), which gave the capability of controlling the receptor concentration of aluminum oxide surfaces. The polymer surface chain responses after exposure to various media were understood by measuring contact angle changes of various probe liquids. T-peel tests of the model polymer - solid interfaces, as a function of time and sticker and receptor group concentrations showed much longer time dependence than the characteristic time of a bulk polymer chain. Additionally, the classical equation of interface failure was re-examined to see the effects of deformation rate, annealing temperature, and annealing time. A simple scaling analysis of free energy of an adsorbed polymer on a solid surface was extended to predict the adhesion potential of the model polymer - solid interfaces. From the experiments and theory of adhesive vs. cohesive failure, it was found that there existed an optimum product value r* = φ(X)φ(Y)χ of sticker concentration φ(X), receptor concentration φ(Y), and their interaction strength χ, which was approximately 150 cal/mol for this polymer - solid interface. Below or above this optimum product value r*, the fracture energy of polymer - solid interfaces, GIC, was less than its optimal value, Gic*.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)299-324
Number of pages26
JournalJournal of Adhesion
Volume75
Issue number3
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

Profile

polymers
Polymers
Butylene Glycols
Edema Disease of Swine
silanes
Silanes
Anthralin
polybutadiene
adhesion
Polybutadienes
carboxylation
aluminum oxides
annealing
products
Carboxylation
Bond strength (materials)
Contact angle
Annealing
Aluminum
Oxides

Keywords

  • Adhesion
  • AFM analysis
  • Carboxylated polybutadiene-aluminum interfaces
  • Contact angle
  • Optimum design
  • Self-assembled silanes
  • SEM analysis
  • Sticker groups
  • T-peel tests
  • XPS analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Materials Science(all)
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Computational Mechanics

Cite this

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title = "Optimum polymer - Solid interface design for adhesion strength: Carboxylation of polybutadiene and mixed silanes surface modification of aluminum oxide",
abstract = "To understand the optimum design of polymer - solid interfaces for adhesion strength, model polymer - solid interfaces of carboxylated polybutadiene (cPBD) adhered to mixed silane modified Al2O3 surfaces were examined. The cPBD, having various - COOH sticker group concentration φ(X) (0 ∼ 10 mol%), was synthesized through high-pressure carboxylation of PBD, while Al2O3 surfaces were modified to have various - NH2 density, φ(Y) (0 ∼ 100 mol%), using self-assembly of mixed amine- and methyl-terminated silanes. The coadsorption kinetic model of the two silanes was analyzed through X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscope (AFM), and dynamic contact angle (DCA), which gave the capability of controlling the receptor concentration of aluminum oxide surfaces. The polymer surface chain responses after exposure to various media were understood by measuring contact angle changes of various probe liquids. T-peel tests of the model polymer - solid interfaces, as a function of time and sticker and receptor group concentrations showed much longer time dependence than the characteristic time of a bulk polymer chain. Additionally, the classical equation of interface failure was re-examined to see the effects of deformation rate, annealing temperature, and annealing time. A simple scaling analysis of free energy of an adsorbed polymer on a solid surface was extended to predict the adhesion potential of the model polymer - solid interfaces. From the experiments and theory of adhesive vs. cohesive failure, it was found that there existed an optimum product value r* = φ(X)φ(Y)χ of sticker concentration φ(X), receptor concentration φ(Y), and their interaction strength χ, which was approximately 150 cal/mol for this polymer - solid interface. Below or above this optimum product value r*, the fracture energy of polymer - solid interfaces, GIC, was less than its optimal value, Gic*.",
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year = "2001",
volume = "75",
pages = "299--324",
journal = "Journal of Adhesion",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Optimum polymer - Solid interface design for adhesion strength

T2 - Journal of Adhesion

AU - Lee,Ilsoon

AU - Wool,Richard P.

PY - 2001

Y1 - 2001

N2 - To understand the optimum design of polymer - solid interfaces for adhesion strength, model polymer - solid interfaces of carboxylated polybutadiene (cPBD) adhered to mixed silane modified Al2O3 surfaces were examined. The cPBD, having various - COOH sticker group concentration φ(X) (0 ∼ 10 mol%), was synthesized through high-pressure carboxylation of PBD, while Al2O3 surfaces were modified to have various - NH2 density, φ(Y) (0 ∼ 100 mol%), using self-assembly of mixed amine- and methyl-terminated silanes. The coadsorption kinetic model of the two silanes was analyzed through X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscope (AFM), and dynamic contact angle (DCA), which gave the capability of controlling the receptor concentration of aluminum oxide surfaces. The polymer surface chain responses after exposure to various media were understood by measuring contact angle changes of various probe liquids. T-peel tests of the model polymer - solid interfaces, as a function of time and sticker and receptor group concentrations showed much longer time dependence than the characteristic time of a bulk polymer chain. Additionally, the classical equation of interface failure was re-examined to see the effects of deformation rate, annealing temperature, and annealing time. A simple scaling analysis of free energy of an adsorbed polymer on a solid surface was extended to predict the adhesion potential of the model polymer - solid interfaces. From the experiments and theory of adhesive vs. cohesive failure, it was found that there existed an optimum product value r* = φ(X)φ(Y)χ of sticker concentration φ(X), receptor concentration φ(Y), and their interaction strength χ, which was approximately 150 cal/mol for this polymer - solid interface. Below or above this optimum product value r*, the fracture energy of polymer - solid interfaces, GIC, was less than its optimal value, Gic*.

AB - To understand the optimum design of polymer - solid interfaces for adhesion strength, model polymer - solid interfaces of carboxylated polybutadiene (cPBD) adhered to mixed silane modified Al2O3 surfaces were examined. The cPBD, having various - COOH sticker group concentration φ(X) (0 ∼ 10 mol%), was synthesized through high-pressure carboxylation of PBD, while Al2O3 surfaces were modified to have various - NH2 density, φ(Y) (0 ∼ 100 mol%), using self-assembly of mixed amine- and methyl-terminated silanes. The coadsorption kinetic model of the two silanes was analyzed through X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscope (AFM), and dynamic contact angle (DCA), which gave the capability of controlling the receptor concentration of aluminum oxide surfaces. The polymer surface chain responses after exposure to various media were understood by measuring contact angle changes of various probe liquids. T-peel tests of the model polymer - solid interfaces, as a function of time and sticker and receptor group concentrations showed much longer time dependence than the characteristic time of a bulk polymer chain. Additionally, the classical equation of interface failure was re-examined to see the effects of deformation rate, annealing temperature, and annealing time. A simple scaling analysis of free energy of an adsorbed polymer on a solid surface was extended to predict the adhesion potential of the model polymer - solid interfaces. From the experiments and theory of adhesive vs. cohesive failure, it was found that there existed an optimum product value r* = φ(X)φ(Y)χ of sticker concentration φ(X), receptor concentration φ(Y), and their interaction strength χ, which was approximately 150 cal/mol for this polymer - solid interface. Below or above this optimum product value r*, the fracture energy of polymer - solid interfaces, GIC, was less than its optimal value, Gic*.

KW - Adhesion

KW - AFM analysis

KW - Carboxylated polybutadiene-aluminum interfaces

KW - Contact angle

KW - Optimum design

KW - Self-assembled silanes

KW - SEM analysis

KW - Sticker groups

KW - T-peel tests

KW - XPS analysis

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M3 - Article

VL - 75

SP - 299

EP - 324

JO - Journal of Adhesion

JF - Journal of Adhesion

SN - 0021-8464

IS - 3

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