Ovalbumin thermal Gelation Prediction by Application of Temperature‐Time History

J. B. HARTE, M. E. ZABIK, R. Y. OFOLI, R. G. MORGAN

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • 3 Citations

Abstract

A model for characterizing changes in viscosity of soy protein during extrusion was adapted to predict apparent viscosity ratio of gelling ovalbumin. For ovalbumin (87% purity) the temperature time histories of 3,5, and 7% gel formation were determined at 85, 90 and 95°C. A back‐extrusion method was used to determine apparent viscosity ratios during gelation. Activation energy for denaturation/gelation was estimated at 159 kJ/mol. The model parameter a (degree of molecular entanglement) was 0.75, 0.75, and 1.0 for 3, 5, and 7% gels, respectively. Reaction rate constants were similar for samples with different protein concentrations. Maximum apparent viscosity ratio increased as protein concentrations increased. The mathematical model was verified by determining apparent viscosity ratios at 86 and 93°C and water holding at 90°C, resulting in R2‐0.93. This model may be useful in predicting ovalbumin thermal gelation apparent viscosity ratios.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages1093-1098
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Food Science
Volume57
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1992

Profile

ovalbumin
Ovalbumin
gelation
Viscosity
viscosity
Hot Temperature
heat
history
Temperature
prediction
temperature
extrusion
Gels
gels
Soybean Proteins
soy protein
denaturation
activation energy
purity
Proteins

Keywords

  • eggs
  • modeling thermal history
  • Ovalbumin
  • thermal gelation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science

Cite this

Ovalbumin thermal Gelation Prediction by Application of Temperature‐Time History. / HARTE, J. B.; ZABIK, M. E.; OFOLI, R. Y.; MORGAN, R. G.

In: Journal of Food Science, Vol. 57, No. 5, 1992, p. 1093-1098.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - MORGAN,R. G.

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