Patterned and Controlled Polyelectrolyte Fractal Growth and Aggregations

Ilsoon Lee, Jin Soo Ahn, Troy R. Hendricks, Michael F. Rubner, Paula T. Hammond

    Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

    • 34 Citations

    Abstract

    Two-dimensional patterned and controlled polyelectrolyte aggregations (e.g., tree-like ramified structures) created by microcontact printing have been demonstrated and discussed. Polyelectrolyte-micropatterned aggregations on surfaces were controlled by the micropattern size and shape of PDMS stamps. The formation of aggregates was dependent on the ink and surface conditions, and the aggregates consisted of two distinct layers; strongly adsorbed, primary uniform layers and weakly adsorbed, secondary aggregation layers positioned on top of the primary layers. The adsorption of the primary layers was strong enough not to be washed away, while the aggregated secondary layers were easily removed by washing. The aggregation of secondary layers showed typical tree-like ramified structures of fractal growth and aggregation. Directional and confined stamping led to directing and confining the growth of the fractal polyelectrolyte clusters, respectively. The micropatterned primary uniform layers were not removed by extensive washing, and they were identified by selective nickel plating and charged particle selective adsorption in which the surface formed positive and negative micropatterns. These functional and patterned surfaces have great potentials for advanced devices and sensors.

    LanguageEnglish (US)
    Pages2478-2483
    Number of pages6
    JournalLangmuir
    Volume20
    Issue number6
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Mar 16 2004

    Profile

    Polyelectrolytes
    Fractals
    Agglomeration
    fractals
    Washing
    Adsorption
    washing
    adsorption
    Nickel plating
    Stamping
    Charged particles
    Ink
    Printing
    Sensors
    stamping
    inks
    plating
    printing
    confining
    charged particles

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
    • Colloid and Surface Chemistry

    Cite this

    Lee, I., Ahn, J. S., Hendricks, T. R., Rubner, M. F., & Hammond, P. T. (2004). Patterned and Controlled Polyelectrolyte Fractal Growth and Aggregations. Langmuir, 20(6), 2478-2483. DOI: 10.1021/la035805+

    Patterned and Controlled Polyelectrolyte Fractal Growth and Aggregations. / Lee, Ilsoon; Ahn, Jin Soo; Hendricks, Troy R.; Rubner, Michael F.; Hammond, Paula T.

    In: Langmuir, Vol. 20, No. 6, 16.03.2004, p. 2478-2483.

    Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

    Lee, I, Ahn, JS, Hendricks, TR, Rubner, MF & Hammond, PT 2004, 'Patterned and Controlled Polyelectrolyte Fractal Growth and Aggregations' Langmuir, vol 20, no. 6, pp. 2478-2483. DOI: 10.1021/la035805+
    Lee I, Ahn JS, Hendricks TR, Rubner MF, Hammond PT. Patterned and Controlled Polyelectrolyte Fractal Growth and Aggregations. Langmuir. 2004 Mar 16;20(6):2478-2483. Available from, DOI: 10.1021/la035805+
    Lee, Ilsoon ; Ahn, Jin Soo ; Hendricks, Troy R. ; Rubner, Michael F. ; Hammond, Paula T./ Patterned and Controlled Polyelectrolyte Fractal Growth and Aggregations. In: Langmuir. 2004 ; Vol. 20, No. 6. pp. 2478-2483
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